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I am hotter than the sun and keep out of sight.
I guide you on your way when you travel at night.
I measure the ozone at a great height.

Yet I was lost in the ice.

What am I?

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19
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Maybe it is:

Polaris

I am hotter than the sun and keep out of sight

the north star's temperature is higher than the sun's and we can't see it at daylight or in the southern hemisphere.

I guide you on your way when you travel at night.

Polaris, the north star, which is very close to the north celestial pole and so guides travellers to the north at night.

I measure the ozone at a great height

The Photochemistry of Ozone Loss in the Arctic Region In Summer (POLARIS) is the latest in a series of high-altitude airborne investigations of atmospheric ozone.

Yet I was lost in the ice (credit to @Morgan G)

refers to the Polaris expedition (1871)

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  • $\begingroup$ You got one line right! But I'm looking for another name for this thing. $\endgroup$ – David Glickman Aug 19 '16 at 13:41
  • $\begingroup$ Closest answer so far! $\endgroup$ – David Glickman Aug 19 '16 at 13:47
  • $\begingroup$ Right answer! But only 2 out of 4 clues solved. $\endgroup$ – David Glickman Aug 19 '16 at 14:23
  • 4
    $\begingroup$ For the last clue: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polaris_expedition $\endgroup$ – Morgan G Aug 19 '16 at 14:36
  • $\begingroup$ @Morgan G - yes. 1 to go... Not sure how to credit you with it though as I can only accept one answer. $\endgroup$ – David Glickman Aug 19 '16 at 14:38
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The answer is

Helium

I am hotter than the sun and keep out of sight.

There are stars that are hotter than the sun, they are made of burning helium. Helium is also usually invisible to the human eye.

I guide you on your way when you travel at night.

Stars are used for navigation at night

I measure the ozone at a great height.

Scientists use helium-filled weather balloons to measure ozone levels in the atmosphere.

Yet I was lost in the ice.

Helium is soluble in ice, which makes measuring helium levels using ice cores difficult.

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8
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You are

the earth’s core.

I am hotter than the sun and keep out of sight.

The Earth’s core is hotter than the surface of the sun. It can’t be seen by us surface dwellers.

I guide you on your way when you travel at night.

The earth’s core consists mainly of molten iron which generates a magnetic field as the earth spins. This magnetic field causes other magnets such as the needle of a compass to align with it and point to the magnetic north pole, allowing travellers to navigate when they have no other way of telling which direction is north.

I measure the ozone at a great height.

The magnetic field extends far further than the surface of the earth and influences the amount of ozone in the upper atmosphere.

Yet I was lost in the ice.

During the ice ages, much of the earth’s surface was covered in ice.

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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Puzzling! Some interesting facts there I didn't know, good explanations and some nice research, +1! $\endgroup$ – Beastly Gerbil Aug 19 '16 at 13:43
  • $\begingroup$ Measuring the ozone means measuring not influencing. $\endgroup$ – David Glickman Aug 19 '16 at 13:44
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks @BeastlyGerbil I've recently enjoyed some of the puzzles that show up in Hot Network Questions and this time, I thought I'd take a look for one that hadn't been answered. $\endgroup$ – Anthony Geoghegan Aug 19 '16 at 13:49
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It could be

Solar Radiation (Or one of the other names for it)

I am hotter than the sun and keep out of sight.

The sun's rays are 5778 Kelvin and the Sun is 5777 Kelvin according to Google. You can't see the sun's rays either because they are Ultra-Violet (UV)

I guide you on your way when you travel at night.

The rays reflect off the moon which is why it looks like it glows. The moonlight could light our way at night

I measure the ozone at a great height.

The ozone layer keeps most UV Rays out

Yet I was lost in the ice

Ice absorbs these rays

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