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This is a simple one liner that someone told me at a group meetup. I think it's deceptively simple - we'll see how long it lasts :)

In the US, I open doors, but in the UK, I am used for profit. What am I?

Hint:

No matter where you are, it performs the same function.

Hint:

This is a common object - the riddle does not describe its function, but rather, its name

Hint:

You almost certainly own one of these

Super mega spoiler hint:

It's right under you nose

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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Any hints? This is a little bit too trickerish... $\endgroup$ – Snickbrack Aug 17 '16 at 7:42
  • $\begingroup$ @Snickbrack You are correct - I should have added them earlier. No answers correct so far :) $\endgroup$ – Jason Cemra Aug 19 '16 at 4:32
  • $\begingroup$ More bloody hints eh chap. At least if it's not answered so far $\endgroup$ – Avik Mohan Aug 20 '16 at 17:36
  • $\begingroup$ @JasonCemra Since this question is closed now, can you add the answer? $\endgroup$ – A J Aug 24 '16 at 4:59
  • $\begingroup$ @AvikMohan You're right - sorry I took so long :) These last two hints ought to narrow it down. $\endgroup$ – Jason Cemra Aug 24 '16 at 4:59

10 Answers 10

16
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Is it:

A pound?

Because:

In US: It can mean knocking on a door
In UK: It's the name of the currency

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    $\begingroup$ Why the downvote? $\endgroup$ – Mithical Aug 17 '16 at 9:29
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    $\begingroup$ Good answer and right where my mind went, (+1) but the reasoning for US works just as well in the UK. I'm unsure about this too but maybe it's something to do with the symbols. In name, US#=UK£ and the # key could be used to open some doors via keypad. $\endgroup$ – Brent Hackers Aug 17 '16 at 11:32
  • $\begingroup$ I think this could be right, Jason Cemra did say it was deceptively simple and nothing says that either explanation has to be exclusive. That does fit for a more common use for each respective country. $\endgroup$ – Forral Aug 17 '16 at 17:33
  • $\begingroup$ How does this fit the last hint? $\endgroup$ – jakerella Aug 25 '16 at 13:42
  • $\begingroup$ My post was way before any of those hints were there - sorry. $\endgroup$ – Toby Aug 26 '16 at 8:35
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Could it be:

Quid

As in the UK:

"Quid" is terminology for £1

And in America:

Quid Pro Quo is defined as - a favour or advantage granted in return for something.

Which is synonymous with:

Opening Doors

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  • $\begingroup$ Again, what works for the US works for the UK. $\endgroup$ – paolo Aug 17 '16 at 14:59
  • $\begingroup$ Ah, the only place I'd ever heard the term was in American TV shows so assumed incorrectly. Oh well :) $\endgroup$ – weejammaz Aug 17 '16 at 15:08
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Perhaps:

Wedge

In the UK (slang):

Wedge can be used for a quantity of money (I live in London and would say this is uncommon though)

In the US (and indeed everywhere...):

A wedge holds a door open

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1
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Are you:

Security?

In the US:

A security officer can open the door for you

In the UK:

Securities is another name for proof of stocks/ bonds.

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  • $\begingroup$ Good answer! But, no, sorry :/ $\endgroup$ – Jason Cemra Aug 19 '16 at 5:01
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I don't know whether the "for profit" bit is chiefly British, but I think the answer is

handle

because you open doors with

a handle

and

to buy or sell something is to handle it. Buying and selling is done for profit. But I couldn't see anything in the dictionary to indicate this is chiefly British usage, so I'm not certain.

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1
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Are you a

slim jim

In the U.S.

Opens car doors

In the U.K.

They're pants which are bought and sold of course.

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1
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Please don't tell me its just

a knob

Note that in the uk

prostitution is legal, so this may be the profit side of it

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  • $\begingroup$ No - the answer isn't that simple :D $\endgroup$ – Jason Cemra Aug 24 '16 at 5:42
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I think it may be:

Gearing

In UK it means: The ratio of a company’s loan capital (debt) to the value of its ordinary shares (equity)

In US: The set or arrangement of gears in a machine, which may open doors in some mechanisms.

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Maybe

Stock

Although this can be used for profit in both countries, I have found some dictionaries citing it as a synonym for

Handle. Eg the Oxford "8.2 The handle of something such as a whip or fishing rod. Perhaps in the US the link to handle is stronger

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0
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Could it be

A Mouth?

In the UK

Call out to advertise your wares you are selling

In the US

Call out to ask if anyone is home

:-/

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