18
$\begingroup$

Can somebody tell me what's the answer on this puzzle? And why?

a busy cat

Thanks!!

$\endgroup$
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Puzzling! This is not a [logic-puzzle]; please check the tag wiki before using a tag. $\endgroup$ – Deusovi Jul 27 '16 at 13:29
  • 16
    $\begingroup$ The literal answer to your question would be "Yes. Because people here are smart." since you asked "Can somebody tell me?". But probably not the answer you were looking for. $\endgroup$ – Floris Jul 27 '16 at 13:37
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Hope you're not asking from the examination hall :P $\endgroup$ – ABcDexter Jul 27 '16 at 17:27
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @ABcDexter Yeah, that would be a slight edge... $\endgroup$ – Revetahw Jul 27 '16 at 19:02
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Are you sure it's OK to repost the question here? $\endgroup$ – WBT Jul 28 '16 at 0:39
42
$\begingroup$

It is

C

Because the third column

is the difference between the first and second column

$\endgroup$
  • 13
    $\begingroup$ Also works if you look at rows instead of columns. $\endgroup$ – The Dark Truth Jul 27 '16 at 13:37
  • $\begingroup$ Ha - that's surprising but true. $\endgroup$ – Floris Jul 27 '16 at 13:38
  • $\begingroup$ Easier to see and two direction variant of the puzzle puzzling.stackexchange.com/questions/38009/… $\endgroup$ – z100 Jul 27 '16 at 15:24
11
$\begingroup$

Correct Answer is

C

Explanation:

Each column and row has exactly 2 circles.
Each of the four corners appears an even number of times in each column or row.

$\endgroup$
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ It looks more to me like you take both pictures, stack them on top of each other, and remove any overlap $\endgroup$ – Areeb Jul 27 '16 at 13:33
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @Areeb Different wording but same effect. $\endgroup$ – The Dark Truth Jul 27 '16 at 13:35
  • 14
    $\begingroup$ Or you could say "XOR the shapes", I believe this sums it up perfectly. $\endgroup$ – Anton Jul 27 '16 at 17:39
11
$\begingroup$

Answer is

C

Because of

XOR operator, applied on columns. Read more about XOR operator here

$\endgroup$
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Hello, and welcome to Puzzling.SE! It is customary to hide your answer with spoiler tags >!. Also, adding a duplicate answer is typically frowned upon unless you can demonstrate a substantially different method of getting there than has been previously mentioned. $\endgroup$ – feelinferrety Jul 27 '16 at 18:03
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ +1 because, except the edit, the answer is good.. but a bit developer way... you may explain XOR $\endgroup$ – lemon Jul 27 '16 at 18:07
  • $\begingroup$ Added documentation link for XOR operator. $\endgroup$ – Ashish Jain Jul 27 '16 at 20:33
  • $\begingroup$ The XOR principle was covered in earlier answers and comments. $\endgroup$ – Prune Jul 27 '16 at 22:51
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ This is the cleanest and most specific answer, and an improvement to the previous. $\endgroup$ – pipe Jul 28 '16 at 8:51
5
$\begingroup$

It is

C

Because :

It works by column, and the third picture depends on the two first.
On the last symbol of the line, you add the symbols of the first and second pictures. If a form (triangle or circle) is present twice, you remove it. Else, you leave it. For example, for the first column : You add the first picture :
(1 triangle at the top right corner and 1 at the top left corner, and 1 circle at the middle), and the second one :
(1 triangle at the top right corner, 1 at the bottom left corner, 1 at the bottom right corner, 0 circle in the middle), so you get : 1 triangle at the top left corner, 2 at the top right, 1 at each bottom and 1 circle, so you just remove the top right one and it gives you the picture at the third line of column number 1.

$\endgroup$
-2
$\begingroup$

I think it is simpler - It is

E

I see two rules:

1. If you scan the rows from the top in rows (vertically) or horizontally in columns, there is a rule that there are always two black solid circles in every row. So we are missing something with a solid black circle, possible answers are A, C, E.
2. All of the solid black circle symbols can be paired off as mirror images of each other, like this:
(a) the bottom left symbol is a mirror image of the middle one in the far right column.
(b) The one in the middle of the top row, is a mirror image of the one in the centre of the middle row.

Following this rule, the un-paired solid black remaining is the one at the top left. A mirror image of this is symbol E.

I'm assuming the three white square symbols (with no solid black circle), are just distractions/noise.

$\endgroup$
  • 9
    $\begingroup$ Never assume that there is "noise" in these puzzles. $\endgroup$ – Floris Jul 27 '16 at 17:08

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.