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(This puzzle is a sequel to The Persistence Of Memory.)


You find yourself on the floor, slowly waking up and unable to remember how you got here. As you slowly come to your senses, you realize that you've woken up in a dim, musty old room. You also realize that you can't remember a thing.

A previously-unseen speaker starts to produce a voice. "Hᴇʟʟᴏ, ᴀɴᴅ ᴡᴇʟᴄᴏᴍᴇ ᴛᴏ ᴍʏ ʟᴀʙʏʀ--"

You cut him off angrily. "Okay, where the hell am I, and why have you brought me here? I'm sure I've never seen this place before. Just let me out of here as soon as you can - I have things to do."

You pause.

"At least, I think I have things to do. I'm not exactly sure. But I know my plans, whatever they might be, don't involve me being in this creepy room."

"Cᴏᴍᴇ ᴏɴ, ᴀʀᴇ ʏᴏᴜ sᴜʀᴇ ʏᴏᴜ ᴅᴏɴ'ᴛ ᴡᴀɴᴛ ᴛᴏ ʜᴇᴀʀ ᴛʜɪs? I sᴘᴇɴᴛ ᴀʟʟ ᴡᴇᴇᴋ ᴍᴀᴋɪɴɢ ɪᴛ sᴏᴜɴᴅ ᴏᴍɪɴᴏᴜs ᴀɴᴅ ᴄᴏᴏʟ."

"Look, I don't know who I am or how I got here. All I care about is being in a place that's as different from right here as possible. Just tell me the rules so I can get this over with."

"Uɢʜ, ғɪɴᴇ. Hᴇʀᴇ ʏᴏᴜ ɢᴏ."

The document he gives you (at least, you suppose the voice is a 'he') seems to have been heavily edited.

The Memory Amnesia Labyrinth Rules

  • You are currently just behind the door in the bottom right top left.
  • You must walk through each of the other rooms before returning to the first room. Steps must be to horizontally or vertically adjacent tiles - no diagonal movement.
  • You may not step on the same tile twice.
  • You must step on every tile in a region.
  • Every time you step between two tiles, a line will be drawn between those two tiles' centers. This means that the line will trace out your path along the tiles, moving like a rook in chess.
  • The most important rule: When your path is completed, every region of the same color and shape must look identical. (If you enter two blue rectangles from the bottom left going up, your paths through them must be exactly the same. You can trace them out in reverse, but the lines left behind must be identical.)
  • Each region has a counterpart that looks the same, but has been turned upside-down.
  • The most important rule: When your path is completed, if you turned in one square, you must go straight through its counterpart, and vice versa. (For instance, you will have to turn in the top right square; this means that you will go straight through the bottom left square of the middle yellow region.)

"But wait, where's the exit?"

"Iᴛ's ʜɪᴅᴅᴇɴ ɪɴ ᴏɴᴇ ᴏғ ᴛʜᴇ ᴡᴀʟʟs. I'ᴍ sᴜʀᴇ ʏᴏᴜ ᴄᴀɴ ғɪɢᴜʀᴇ ɪᴛ ᴏᴜᴛ."

The speaker shuts off and you notice that a map is sitting just below the door. You pick it up and unfold it...

enter image description here

(For the color-blind, I have marked all groups of 1×1 squares with symbols.)

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  • $\begingroup$ Any patterns you see in the layout of the regions are purely coincidental and in no way related to any recent events here on Puzzling.SE. $\endgroup$ – Deusovi Jul 26 '16 at 22:31
  • $\begingroup$ Small clarification about "turned upside down" - did you mean a diagonal reflection? $\endgroup$ – Aza Jul 26 '16 at 23:50
  • $\begingroup$ @Emrakul: No, it's a 180° rotation. Remember, the actual patterns don't matter - only whether you turn or go straight through. $\endgroup$ – Deusovi Jul 26 '16 at 23:52
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    $\begingroup$ just some further help for the colorblind: the two 2x1 dominos which are on the vertical middle axis are of color A, the other two touching the outer walls are of color B $\endgroup$ – elias Jul 27 '16 at 0:15
  • $\begingroup$ For the color blind, Bonjovi♦ included a link somewhere in the riddle which appears blue to us so we know it's a link. You better move your mouse all over the text until you find it :) (hint: it's within the first line) $\endgroup$ – Avigrail Jul 27 '16 at 6:31
8
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A possible path :

enter image description here

Proof that it works : (S means straight and T means turn )

enter image description here

I don't really know how I've find it, mostly trying some random paths + an incredible luck.
Here is a smart move to start because it forces a lot of other moves

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