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Give the right guess in an English sentence self answering puzzle offer that contains eighty four words, one hundred and nineteen syllables, ten As, two Bs, five Cs, seven Ds, fifty nine Es, fifteen Fs, nine Gs, fourteen Hs, twenty one Is, one J, one K, seven Ls, three Ms, forty Ns, nineteen Os, four Ps, one Q, seventeen Rs, forty Ss, thirty Ts, seven Us, eight Vs, five Ws, one X, ten Ys, three Zs, thirty commas, eighty three spaces, and one period.

Edit: I originally posted "Post other self answering puzzles," but this makes this entry very broad and against forum rules. However, the above puzzle has a very specific answer that is given by ABcDexter below.

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closed as too broad by Deusovi, xnor, CodeNewbie, Alconja, Aza Jul 11 '16 at 4:22

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Are you just asking for us to come up with autograms? $\endgroup$ – Will Jul 9 '16 at 20:28
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    $\begingroup$ @Will In the same family as the autogram and the Quine, but slightly different, I think: a puzzle that is it's own solution. either a question that answers itself, or a command that satisfies itself. $\endgroup$ – Peter Jul 9 '16 at 20:43
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    $\begingroup$ @Will, as mentioned by Peter, I am asking for a puzzle that is its own solution. For example, the sentence "this sentence has five words," is an autogram, but it's not a self answering puzzle/request. The sentence "give a sentence that has seven words," is its own solution. The puzzle has to make some request that the puzzle itself fulfills such that one could just give the puzzle back as a solution. $\endgroup$ – rjones Jul 9 '16 at 21:08
  • $\begingroup$ This is definitely way too broad. $\endgroup$ – Deusovi Jul 11 '16 at 2:15
  • $\begingroup$ Perhaps you meant: "T h i s i s w a y t o o b r o a d ." $\endgroup$ – Gerald Patriowski Jul 11 '16 at 4:25

11 Answers 11

10
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The

paragraph itself.
Give the right guess in an English sentence self answering puzzle offer that contains eighty four words, one hundred and nineteen syllables, ten As, two Bs, five Cs, seven Ds, fifty nine Es, fifteen Fs, nine Gs, fourteen Hs, twenty one Is, one J, one K, seven Ls, three Ms, forty Ns, nineteen Os, four Ps, one Q, seventeen Rs, forty Ss, thirty Ts, seven Us, eight Vs, five Ws, one X, ten Ys, three Zs, thirty commas, eighty three spaces, and one period.

is the answer.

Let me write a code for that. will update soon...

//ABcDexter, puzzling.SE,q/37303/1766, 10/7/16 1211
#include <bits/stdc++.h>
using namespace std;

int i,n,t;
string inp;
int count[26]={0};

int main()
{   

//cin>>inp;
char ch;
int words=0,commas=0,spaces=0,periods=0; 


for(i=0; (ch=getchar()) && (ch!='\n'); i++) 
{   
    inp+=ch;//cout<<ch;
    switch(ch)
    { 
        case ' ' : words++,spaces++;
                break;
        case ',': commas++;
                break;
        case '.': periods++;
                break;
        default: //cout<<inp[i];
                if(inp[i]>='a' && inp[i]<='z') ::count[inp[i]-'a']++;
                else if(inp[i]>='A' && inp[i]<='Z') ::count[inp[i]-'A']++;

    }
}

cout<<"Here is the count\n";
cout<<"Number of words : "<<++words<<endl; //words+1 as one more for the final word with no space at the end;
for(int i=0;i<26;i++)
    cout<<"count of "<<char(i+65)<<" "<<::count[i]<<endl;

cout<<"Number of commas : "<<commas<<endl;
cout<<"Number of spaces : "<<spaces<<endl;
cout<<"Number of periods : "<<periods<<"\nsorry, don't know how to count syllables"<<endl; 



return 0;
}
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3
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How about:

Who's on first (?/.)

Sorry. :)

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1
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Which question answer is this?

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11
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This is one that relies on the absence of explicit punctuation (so either directly lacking punctuation when written, as below, or speaking the puzzle out loud).

What is the most commonly used interrogative word in the English language

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  • $\begingroup$ That is interesting :) $\endgroup$ – ABcDexter Jul 10 '16 at 17:46
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    $\begingroup$ @ABcDexter - it's worth noting that I'm assuming it to be true. It's hard to confirm it with any confidence, but given that it's often used in place of "pardon" by most children (and probably most adults), I'm pretty confident of its accuracy. $\endgroup$ – Glen O Jul 10 '16 at 17:49
  • $\begingroup$ Why is the most common interrogative not what [punctuation removed, ^vote added] $\endgroup$ – humn Jul 10 '16 at 20:15
5
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Provide proof that this sentence exists.

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2
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Which question resulted only seven answers where the last answer was accepted and had the maximum votes?

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  • $\begingroup$ Sorry to be nitpicky, but the solution to this puzzle is the question at the top of the page, not your puzzle itself. $\endgroup$ – Peter Jul 10 '16 at 12:53
4
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Can you provide a question that asks you to provide a question that asks you to provide a question?

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3
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Just a smarty-pants alternate guess in case ABcDexter's likely-correct answer isn't the “right guess”:

Give the right guess in one [swapped] English sentence self answering puzzle offer that contains eighty four words, one hundred and nineteen syllables, ten As, two Bs, five Cs, seven Ds, fifty nine Es, fifteen Fs, nine Gs, fourteen Hs, twenty one Is, one J, one K, seven Ls, three Ms, forty Ns, nineteen Os, four Ps, one Q, seventeen Rs, forty Ss, thirty Ts, seven Us, eight Vs, five Ws, an [swapped] X, ten Ys, three Zs, thirty commas [“commas” contains a “comma”], eighty three spaces [discretionary comma removed] and one period.

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  • $\begingroup$ Ooops, this has extra "period" after all. $\endgroup$ – humn Jul 10 '16 at 6:44
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Which is the most self-answering puzzle?

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  • $\begingroup$ Vote of approval in case this turns out to be the most self-answering puzzle while I'm not looking $\endgroup$ – humn Jul 9 '16 at 22:50
15
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Which question formed an answer on this page that received 15 upvotes?

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  • $\begingroup$ Come on guys, don't let me down. $\endgroup$ – Peter Jul 9 '16 at 20:47
  • $\begingroup$ Think I'll wait to see 14 or 15 votes before deciding (just kidding, but if this gets edited I can change my ^vote so far) $\endgroup$ – humn Jul 9 '16 at 21:17
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    $\begingroup$ I like this answer, but if I upvote it it will be wrong and I won't like it any more $\endgroup$ – Nathaniel Jul 10 '16 at 8:13
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    $\begingroup$ Only 15? Come on, there would have been room for a bit more ambition! $\endgroup$ – ilkkachu Jul 10 '16 at 11:06
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    $\begingroup$ didn't thought I would say that but: nice answer, -1! $\endgroup$ – Sechiro Jul 11 '16 at 12:01
5
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Is this one?

Provide a self-answering puzzle.

Paradox time!

Provide a puzzle that is not self-answering.

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  • $\begingroup$ Vote of approval for the fun ideas. (The first one could be assigned a truth value of false, though, without contradiction.) $\endgroup$ – humn Jul 9 '16 at 21:38

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