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This is a rendezvous of distinctly unique individuals. Some were responsible for strong weapons and others responsible for maintaining the wealth. There were also those who were extremely poisonous in nature and those who were responsible for maintaining life. The first individual was responsible for ensuring the abundance of water. The Greeks were responsible for this. The Germans ensured that the centre of the gathering was occupied by a troublesome individual. Each individual earned their position only due to their inherent nature.

What am I talking about?

As in my previous question, this riddle also indirectly means something.

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Are you talking about

the elements / the periodic table?

This is a rendezvous of distinctly unique individuals.

The elements are certainly distinct and unique.

Some were responsible for strong weapons

Nuclear bombs (Uranium, Plutonium, even Hydrogen)

and others responsible for maintaining the wealth

Money is made from gold, silver, copper, zinc.

There were also those who were extremely poisonous in nature

Mercury, arsenic, or radioactive elements.

and those who were responsible for maintaining life.

Carbon and oxygen, as well as sodium, potassium, iron, etc.

The first individual was responsible for ensuring the abundance of water. The Greeks were responsible for this.

Hydrogen, which is Greek for "water-forming", is the first element and 2/3 (by number) of water.

The Germans ensured that the centre of the gathering was occupied by a troublesome individual.

Cobalt (see Brent Hackers' comment)

Each individual earned their position only due to their inherent nature.

The elements are placed in the table according to their natural properties.

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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Could be this... "In 1730, chemist Georg Brandt of Stockholm became interested in a dark blue ore from some local copper workings and he eventually proved that it contained a hitherto unrecognised metal and he gave it the name by which its ore was cursed by miners in Germany, where it was sometimes mistaken for a silver ore. He published his results in 1739. For many years his claim to have uncovered a new metal was disputed by other chemists who said his new element was really a compound of iron and arsenic, but eventually it was recognised as an element in its own right." $\endgroup$ – Brent Hackers Jun 18 '16 at 6:24
  • $\begingroup$ @BrentHackers seems reasonable. Quite a random fact to throw in. $\endgroup$ – kayzeroshort Jun 18 '16 at 15:49
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    $\begingroup$ My guess is that Technetium (which was discovered by German chemists) is in the middle of the table and is radioactive, despite all nearby elements being stable. $\endgroup$ – Business Cat Jun 20 '16 at 13:12

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