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A king had a pet dog, which was a German Shepherd.

One day, the dog bit the king on the leg.

The king got mad at his dog, and he wanted the dog to be killed, but not by himself.

So he announced that anyone who kills the dog will get 1000 gold coins.

But on the condition that whatever way you kill the dog, the king will do the same thing to you.

How can you kill the dog and keep yourself alive?

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    $\begingroup$ the same way king will kill you too., is this supposed to say the king will do the same to you, not kill you too. As the riddle is unsolvable with the former. $\endgroup$ – user13083 Jun 14 '16 at 13:54
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    $\begingroup$ Are you sure that "A puzzle that needs formal logical deduction to arrive at a solution." applies to your puzzle?? (See tag-description for logic-puzzle) $\endgroup$ – BmyGuest Jun 14 '16 at 15:08
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    $\begingroup$ this one is too popular but unfortunately forgot the ans.... Just remember that it was quiet interesting and logical. $\endgroup$ – wrangler Jun 14 '16 at 18:54
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    $\begingroup$ the logic is in: what a dog has and a human doesn't. I don't know what these people felt wrong with my question. I was expecting a quick answer. $\endgroup$ – Wasiq Shahrukh Jun 14 '16 at 20:38
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    $\begingroup$ The answerers have gotten perfectly valid solutions, they just aren't the specific solution you're thinking of. $\endgroup$ – f'' Jun 14 '16 at 20:54
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Here is one (simple) funny solution :

Injecting poison in the dog's tail

:D

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My guess:

They could feed the dog chocolate. Chocolate is poison to dogs but not to humans

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    $\begingroup$ that would work with grapes too. +1 $\endgroup$ – Sechiro Jun 14 '16 at 13:43
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    $\begingroup$ Chocolate is poisonous to humans also in large quantities. LD50 for humans is ~1,000mg/kg, dogs is only around a third of that at 300mg/kg $\endgroup$ – user13083 Jun 14 '16 at 13:53
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    $\begingroup$ @User112638726, that's the LD50 for theobromine, not for chocolate itself. I assure you that as a male weighing less than 100kg, I have eaten more than 100g of chocolate (your proposed LD50) on a fairly consistent basis and never been even mildly indisposed. Theobromine is approximately 2% of cocoa powder by weight, so LD50 of cocoa powder is about 50,000mg/kg (or 50g/kg), meaning it would take about 5kg to be an LD50 dose for a 100kg human. In chocolate the theobromine content is even lower (0.2% to 0.7%). (source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theobromine ) $\endgroup$ – Hellion Jun 14 '16 at 15:08
  • $\begingroup$ There are also dozens of human foods that wouldn't suit dogs: tomatoes for once, onions, etc. $\endgroup$ – Inazuma Jun 14 '16 at 21:13
  • $\begingroup$ @Hellion I meant the "poisonous" part. I was just pointing out that it isn't that much more poisonous to dogs than to humans. Your comment is also unnecessarily condescending. Also 100kg is a very large person. $\endgroup$ – user13083 Jun 14 '16 at 23:13
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All of the current answers are invalid, as they ignore that the king "will kill you the same way". There is no escaping the dog's fate, so:

Send the dog to a farm in the country, where he'll live out the rest of his days peacefully and die of old age (and you collect your 1000 coins).

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    $\begingroup$ I don t agree: as the text says "the king will do the same thing to you" it doesn't mean he will kill you the same way. so if you feed the dog with 200g of chocolate the king should do the same: feeding you with 200 g of chocolate. Anyway I like your solution ^^. $\endgroup$ – Sechiro Jun 14 '16 at 14:10
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    $\begingroup$ Fantastic, another user just edited the puzzle from "the same way king [sic] will kill you too" to make my answer incorrect... $\endgroup$ – Roland Jun 14 '16 at 14:17
  • $\begingroup$ @Roland yes it has to be "the king will do the same" and not "kill you the same way" $\endgroup$ – Wasiq Shahrukh Jun 15 '16 at 8:32
  • $\begingroup$ @Roland I would like to argue that your answer wouldn't work anyway, since the definition of 'kill' is to 'cause the death of (a person, animal, or other living thing)'. You've sent the dog to a country farm, but you haven't caused his death. There's not exactly any 'passive' way of killing. $\endgroup$ – Inazuma Jun 15 '16 at 9:16
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A darker answer:

German shepherds weigh about half of that of humans (depending on male/female of both species). Assuming our blood to mass ratio is about the same, and about 40% of blood (2 L) is needed for a human to die from blood loss, we would drain just about half amount of the blood from both the dog (e.g. about 1L). Thus the dog would die but the human could recover.
Once again, certainly a very dark answer.

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Again dark. But I'm not the one who asked the question!

Lock the dog in a freezer of -10 degrees Celsius for 48 hours with a gas stove, gas tank and matches.

A human hopefully has enough sense to light the gas stove keeping himself warm to survive...

After the comments below have raised some good points here are a few more ideas:

1. Put the dog in a very hot room (e.g. greenhouse with no ventilation etc.) The room has a skylight and a ladder lying flat on the floor.

2. Place the dog in a room with a number lock on the door and the combination code clearly written beside it.

3. The room is sealed shut and the door opens automatically if you successfully win a game of football of FIFA 16 on an X-Box! (The X-Box is provided :-))

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    $\begingroup$ Running a gas stove in an enclosed freezer for 48 hours would guarantee to use up all the oxygen and suffocate you. $\endgroup$ – GentlePurpleRain Jun 14 '16 at 17:00
  • $\begingroup$ @GentlePurpleRain +1 I wonder if they'd run out of oxygen and die before they couldn't keep the flame going? Freezication. Might depend on the size of the freezer and whether it has any kind of ventilation. $\endgroup$ – Brent Hackers Jun 14 '16 at 19:41
  • $\begingroup$ Maybe just put the dog in a freezer with a handle on the inside instead? $\endgroup$ – Brent Hackers Jun 14 '16 at 19:43
  • $\begingroup$ Using the fact that a dog's internal body temperature is slightly above ours, we could cool it down to a temperature where the dog would get hypothermia and we wouldn't (similar to how some bees can 'cook' hornets) $\endgroup$ – Inazuma Jun 14 '16 at 22:00

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