11
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Ausfüllen the espacios vides

    1    2    3    4    5    6    7
  +----+----+----+----+----+----+----+
1 | D4 | O1 | E3 | T1 | A1 | A2 |    |
  +----+----+----+----+----+----+----+
2 | F0 | O1 | T2 | D1 |    | A1 | D4 |
  +----+----+----+----+----+----+----+
3 | D3 | U1 |    | T3 | C3 | O1 | S4 |
  +----+----+----+----+----+----+----+
4 |    | E3 | N1 | D2 | R2 | I2 | D2 |
  +----+----+----+----+----+----+----+

Hints

  1. Each row contains the same things.

  2. Start by ignoring the digits of the codes, they depend on the things identified by the characters and will be a new challenge once you have discovered the content.

  3. The order of the row's entries is determined by the row, and $2$ rows have the same order.

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  • $\begingroup$ What exactly to do with the alphanumeric codes? Is there any pattern to solve for the answer? $\endgroup$ – ABcDexter Jun 14 '16 at 17:41
  • $\begingroup$ @ABcDexter added 3 hints to get you going, I think it may be a tough puzzle without. $\endgroup$ – Jonathan Allan Jun 14 '16 at 18:17
  • $\begingroup$ Por qué ist es auf Deutsch y en español? $\endgroup$ – Joe Z. Jun 14 '16 at 18:30
  • $\begingroup$ @JoeZ. I think you mean to ask, "Warum use varios langues?". $\endgroup$ – Jonathan Allan Jun 14 '16 at 18:38
  • $\begingroup$ Oh, "colonnes" is French! D: That makes sense. $\endgroup$ – Joe Z. Jun 14 '16 at 18:41
11
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Edit: Jetzt the solución entière. Die four líneas représentent:

The four rows correspond to the four languages in the title and in the question: German, English, Spanish and French, in that order.

Die four columnas représentent:

The seven columns are the seven days of the week, but not in alphabetical order. (Thanks to ffao for pointing that out.) The letters are the first letter of the day in the respective language in the first columns, the second letter of the day in the second column and so on.

The days are:

de: Dienstag dOnnerstag frEitag mitTwoch montAg samstAg sonntaG
en: Friday mOnday saTurday sunDay thurSday tuesdAy wednesDay
es: Domingo jUeves luNes marTes miérColes sábadO vierneS
fr: Dimanche jEudi luNdi marDi mercRedi samedI vendreDi

Und the números sont:

The numbers are counts of the letters that the sorted day of the week share with the number of the column in the corresponding language. Multiple occurrences of the same letter are counted as distinct letters:

dIENStag donnErstag fREItag mIttwoch moNtag SamStag SoNntag
EINS zwEi dREI vIer fueNf SechS SiebeN
4 1 3 1 1 2 2

friday mOnday saTuRday sUnday thursday tueSday wEdNESday
one twO ThRee foUr five Six SEvEN
0 1 2 2 0 1 4

dOmiNgo jueveS lunES mARTes mIerCOles Sabado vIErnES
uNO doS trES cuATRo CIncO Seis SIEtE
2 1 2 3 3 1 4

dimaNche jEUDi lundI mARdi merCredI SamedI vEndredi
uN DEUx troIs quAtRe CInq SIx sEpt
1 3 1 2 2 2 1

In comparison to the question, I've got different counts for domingo and vendredi. The number one causes problems for all languages except English, because it conflates with the indirect singular article. I've tried to use the variant that is used when counting.

Schliesslich, the table complète:

| 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
| +----+----+----+----+----+----+----+
| 1 | D4 | O1 | E3 | T1 | A1 | A2 | G2 |
| +----+----+----+----+----+----+----+
| 2 | F0 | O1 | T2 | D1 | S0 | A1 | D4 |
| +----+----+----+----+----+----+----+
| 3 | D3 | U1 | N2 | T3 | C3 | O1 | S4 |
| +----+----+----+----+----+----+----+
| 4 | D1 | E3 | N1 | D2 | R2 | I2 | D2 |
| +----+----+----+----+----+----+----+

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  • 3
    $\begingroup$ The ordering is not arbitrary; they're all in alphabetical order (except for the last two in German, which I think you should swap) $\endgroup$ – ffao Jun 16 '16 at 0:39
  • $\begingroup$ @ffao: Very good, didn't see that. The insight might provide a new angle for the numbers. It also makes my comment about Sonnabend/Samstag moot. $\endgroup$ – M Oehm Jun 16 '16 at 5:08
  • $\begingroup$ Looking good so far $\endgroup$ – Jonathan Allan Jun 17 '16 at 12:03
  • $\begingroup$ This is so close to correct that I am accepting - the counts are simply the number remaining in the first after removing any not in the second - this should "correct" the two you have out of line (and the top-right unknown). $\endgroup$ – Jonathan Allan Aug 13 '16 at 15:22

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