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I am not from US. I have heard that US laws don't allow to cremate a man living in Texas, in New York. Can anyone tell me why?


Note: Don't think that I have posted this question here by accident. It's a puzzle. Really. Trust me. ;)

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    $\begingroup$ This question appears to be a duplicate of... wait?! What happened to question 2417?? The top answer on question 2417 was accepted at +25. Cached from google $\endgroup$ – turbulencetoo Nov 5 '14 at 13:52
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    $\begingroup$ ah, this meta post might be related to my confusion. $\endgroup$ – turbulencetoo Nov 5 '14 at 13:57
  • $\begingroup$ @turbulencetoo, it wasn't deleted when the bulk of those were. I still had the rep from my answer yesterday, but it's gone today. $\endgroup$ – Peter Taylor Nov 5 '14 at 14:05
  • $\begingroup$ @Peter I had gained 45 upvotes from an answer to a deleted question that had been around for a while, that was deleted. I also 15 from another... I lost 2 privledges from this incident! $\endgroup$ – warspyking Nov 5 '14 at 19:09
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If the man is living somewhere, he's probably alive... and cremating a man who is alive is murder and hence illegal

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While there are two existing good answers, the better answer is logistics.

There is an existing history of men living in Texas being cremated. The problem is that if they are living in Texas, it is physical impossible to cremate them in New York, so it is a law of Physics not US law, that prevents it.

It is not unusual for various US laws to attempt to alter empirical truths, which is probably the root of the confusion in your question.

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  • $\begingroup$ If by "living" they really mean "is a permanent resident of", then the person living in Texas could have been deported to New York and fried there. $\endgroup$ – Joe Z. Nov 5 '14 at 14:35
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    $\begingroup$ en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York,_Texas $\endgroup$ – Florian F Nov 5 '14 at 17:17
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    $\begingroup$ @FlorianF +1 for LOL; alternatively en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texas,_New_York $\endgroup$ – James Jenkins Nov 5 '14 at 17:19
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    $\begingroup$ @JoeZ. RE: " If by "living" they really mean "is a permanent resident of" ", than your person need neither be living nor in New York/Texas, bypassing the intent of the question. $\endgroup$ – James Jenkins Nov 5 '14 at 18:00
  • $\begingroup$ I understand that it bypasses the intent of the question. But then again, it was facetious like your answer. $\endgroup$ – Joe Z. Nov 5 '14 at 18:03
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Obviously laws will not allow you to cremate a man in New York if he's living in Texas, infact it don't matter where he is, as long as

He's living

Cremating someone like that is infact

Murder

Making it illegal!

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    $\begingroup$ :) Good Answer, but do you feel it adds significantly to the other answer $\endgroup$ – skv Nov 5 '14 at 12:07
  • $\begingroup$ @skv Eh so-so I guess $\endgroup$ – warspyking Nov 5 '14 at 12:29
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I guess it would be discouraged in general to cremate any human being, who is living in some country.

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The laws don't allow for impossibilities. If he's living (alive) in Texas, he can't be in New York.

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One CAN transport dead bodies and cremate them elsewhere. Show me the law that prevents that. Such action would not always be illogical, let alone impossible. You seem to be defending your position out of personal attachment, not logic. One could draw Venn diagrams and show a set of people who lived in Texas, died in Texas, were transported to New York, and cremated. That set would not be completely within the set of illegal activity nor would it be completely within the set of impossible activity.

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  • $\begingroup$ Apparently you've missed the trick of this question. It has nothing to do with moving dead bodies because it says the person is living. $\endgroup$ – f'' May 20 '16 at 22:31

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