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I'm addicted to this stuff.

I had my first double when I was 16. There were five of us that night on the town. I didn't think much of it then, but two years later I had another double, and then another the following year.

That was when I first realized I might have a problem. I cut it off cold-turkey for the next 3 years, but then it came back with a vengeance. I had a double, then the next year I had a triple. The year after that I had three doubles in a row!

I slowed down a bit after that; only one double a year for the next two years, and then a long dry spell. I only cheated once until I was 38.

Then I fell hard. I had two doubles that year, followed by a double and a triple the next year, then two doubles and a triple. I just had my first quadruple, and I don't know what I'm going to have next year.

Do you?

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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Unclear: "a triple the next year, then two doubles and a triple". The "two doubles and a triple" refer to the same year? or the year after? $\endgroup$ – fffred May 6 '16 at 14:47
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    $\begingroup$ THIS is a good example of a number sequence puzzle. $\endgroup$ – Deusovi May 6 '16 at 15:58
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    $\begingroup$ @Deusovi - Thanks - I was afraid I might be giving away too much just by using that tag, but it was a choice between that and "math", and that arguably gives away more. Wasn't aware that "number-sequence" puzzles had such a bad reputation... $\endgroup$ – Darrel Hoffman May 6 '16 at 17:55
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    $\begingroup$ Yeah, most puzzles under [number-sequence] are something like "13, 21, 34, what comes next?" - nearly always very low quality. This one's really good though! $\endgroup$ – Deusovi May 6 '16 at 17:56
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    $\begingroup$ I have several dubbels, tripels, and quads a week.. If this guy thinks he has a problem having one a year, I think I need to talk to someone $\endgroup$ – Question Marks May 6 '16 at 18:17
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Next year you're going to have:

a triple.

The references are to:

groups of repeated digits in the number 2^Y, where Y is the year number. Here's a table of results:

16 -> 2^16 = 65536
17 -> 2^17 = 131072
18 -> 2^18 = 262144
19 -> 2^19 = 524288
20 -> 2^20 = 1048576
21 -> 2^21 = 2097152
22 -> 2^22 = 4194304
23 -> 2^23 = 8388608
24 -> 2^24 = 16777216
25 -> 2^25 = 33554432
26 -> 2^26 = 67108864
27 -> 2^27 = 134217728
28 -> 2^28 = 268435456
29 -> 2^29 = 536870912
30 -> 2^30 = 1073741824
31 -> 2^31 = 2147483648
32 -> 2^32 = 4294967296
33 -> 2^33 = 8589934592
34 -> 2^34 = 17179869184
35 -> 2^35 = 34359738368
36 -> 2^36 = 68719476736
37 -> 2^37 = 137438953472
38 -> 2^38 = 274877906944
39 -> 2^39 = 549755813888
40 -> 2^40 = 1099511627776
41 -> 2^41 = 2199023255552
42 -> 2^42 = 4398046511104

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  • 17
    $\begingroup$ Ha! Powerful! Get it? $\endgroup$ – charfellow May 6 '16 at 16:02
  • $\begingroup$ Nailed it. Might be good to add some explanations of the clues, but this is the correct answer. $\endgroup$ – Darrel Hoffman May 6 '16 at 17:05
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Work in progress:

You will have ...


Here's a timeline of #s in your habit:

* 16: first double
5 of us that night on town
* 18 double,
* 19 double
first time realized problem
* 20 cut off
* 21 cut off
* 22 cut off
* 23 double
* 24 triple
* 25 three doubles in a row
* 26 one double a yr
* 27 one double a yr
only one cheat until age 38
* 38 two doubles
* 39 double and triple
* 40 had two doubles & a triple
* 41 first quadruple
what will have next year? [42?]

The pattern I notice above is that:

* You can fit 8 in twice once yr=16, when you had your first double
* You can fit in 8 in three times at yr=24, when you had 3 doubles, so maybe double is referring to an operation upon # 4. A 'double' is 4*2=8, 3 doubles is 8*3=24.
Not sure what coherent pattern keeps up throughout this madness yet, however.

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  • $\begingroup$ You're off by one on the middle section - 20, 21, and 22 have none. It came back at 23. $\endgroup$ – Darrel Hoffman May 6 '16 at 15:17
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for clarification @DarrelHoffman. I cleaned up the timeline $\endgroup$ – cr0 May 6 '16 at 15:21

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