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I create new things
By fluctuations in all
Destroys each other

Incredibly small
They are here and there? Perhaps.
You will never know

What am I?

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  • $\begingroup$ Wait. Isn't it pointless to guess on this one? According to the last line, OP will never know the answer. $\endgroup$ – Hugh Meyers Apr 15 '16 at 10:23
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Quantum fields

Because

I create new things By fluctuations in all

Quantum fields fluctuate, spontaneously creating pairs of one particle and its anti particle.

Destroys each other

The two annihilate later

Incredibly small They are here and there? Perhaps. You will never know

Particles are very small. Indeed, the fundamental ones have no size, as much as we can tell. Quantum mechanics tell us we never really know where a particle will appear. We are not sensitive to the field itself, which is deterministic, but to the random apparent position of the particle it corresponds to.

As an extension of this, the answer could be

Quantum vacuum or simply vacuum, because pair creation can happen in vacuum (which is never an absolute vacuum)

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  • $\begingroup$ You did it! YAY!! $\endgroup$ – You Apr 15 '16 at 13:28
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You are:

Strings

Creating new things

Strings are thought to be responsible for the existence of matter

By fluctuations in all

Strings determine the state/type of matter through their vibrational state

Destroys each other

The collision between two strings can result in their destruction??


Incredibly small

Strings are very small, likely the smallest particle

They are here and there

They may or may not exist. If they do, they make up the framework for everything.

You will never know

There is no reliable way to prove or disprove this theory.

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  • $\begingroup$ I honestly have no idea if string collisions result in destruction. But good answer! $\endgroup$ – You Apr 14 '16 at 22:08
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You are:

Electrons

I create new things

molecular bonds are formed by electrons

By fluctuations in all

specifically the fluctuation of the magnetic field created by the movement of the electron creates a dipole causing molecules to bond together.

Destroys each other

not sure but this might refer to electron-positron annihilation.

Incredibly small

Smallest particle that we know of (I think)

They are here and there? Perhaps.

Electrons (or leptons) go in and out of existence. Can also refer to the wave-particle duality, where they act like waves.

You will never know

There is no way to get the exact location and the momentum of the particles so you will never know where they are and where they are going. (Uncertainty principle)


Second attempt:

Thoughts

I create new things

Thoughts turn into new things everyday (Art)

By fluctuations in all

Innovative thinking is like a fluctuation of the original product

Destroys each other

Each new thought can destroy the previous one.

Incredibly small. They are here and there? Perhaps. You will never know

Its hard to measure where a thought was created

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  • $\begingroup$ Why do I always post riddles that allow for false positives? Good answer, but not the one I intended. (It's more vague...) $\endgroup$ – You Apr 15 '16 at 1:49
  • $\begingroup$ Haha no worries. Puzzles are tough to make! Good puzzle though! I will keep trying $\endgroup$ – stackErr Apr 15 '16 at 1:53
  • $\begingroup$ @You hows my second attempt? $\endgroup$ – stackErr Apr 15 '16 at 1:59
  • $\begingroup$ You drifted into the wrong direction. You were so close before and then plop! $\endgroup$ – You Apr 15 '16 at 2:01
  • $\begingroup$ @You Hahaha I give up! $\endgroup$ – stackErr Apr 15 '16 at 2:03
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Answer:

A wave.

I create new things

All matter is wave-like. All phenomena in nature have wavelike behavior.

By fluctuations in all

Waves 'fluctuate' between the peak and trough

Destroys each other

Two waves can interfere to amplify or cancel eachother out. This is called wave interference.

Incredibly small

Waves of matter have unfathomably 'small' wavelengths

They are here and there? Perhaps.

You might have heard that at the particle level we cannot know a particle's position and momentum simultaneously. This is called Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. It doesn't happen because our measurements are not precise enough, but because particles are wave-like. This uncertainty between momentum and position is embedded in nature and is a direct consequence of how waves work. (The top wave in the image has a well defined momentum, the lower wave has a well defined position)

You will never know

If you want to know how fast a particle is moving, you won't know where it is, if you know where it is, you won't know how fast it's moving. Because of Heisenberg's principle these wave-like particles appear to behave rather unpredictably on very small scales. We cannot know their 'conjugate variables'. We cannot ever know everything about a particle (because of its wave-like behavior).

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  • $\begingroup$ You are very close! :) $\endgroup$ – You Apr 15 '16 at 13:28

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