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I'll leave my slip behind you see
And the dress comes off when it's only me

The proper fathom's set to my draft
Or else I'll find another craft

The men I know, they toe the line,
Or else they'll learn to drink the brine

If they do leave, I'll stay my ground
I trust my lass, to be well found.

Who am I?

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    $\begingroup$ Definitely ship-related; slip could refer to slipway? $\endgroup$ – 2012rcampion Apr 9 '16 at 5:22
  • $\begingroup$ Is it supposed to be 'litorally' in the title? Shouldn't it be literally unless its a clue in the puzzle? $\endgroup$ – Beastly Gerbil Apr 9 '16 at 11:34
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    $\begingroup$ litoral / littoral = coastal / coastline / seashore / intertidal, Shouldn't this be tagged litoral-thinking? $\endgroup$ – humn Apr 9 '16 at 13:45
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I believe you are...

A ship's captain. The lines with "my" may refer to either the ship or her captain, for they are synonymous to an extent.

I'll leave my slip behind you see
And the dress comes off when it's only me

As others have mentioned, a boat sets sail from a slipway. A ship's "dressing" refers to the flags they fly to relay information or messages. When a ship is by her lonesome or occupied/seen by none other than her captain, she has no need to communicate.

The proper fathom's set to my draft
Or else I'll find another craft

The "draft" of a ship is the part of the hull that dips below water. If the buoyancy of the ship is not properly calibrated, it will not be very effective (or safe) for travel at sea, and, as captain, your best bet is with another craft.

The men I know, they toe the line,
Or else they'll learn to drink the brine

Sailors must follow the rules (alternately, a possible origin of the phrase -- line up with feet aligned to the planks for inspection and/or lecture) or risk being thrown overboard.

If they do leave, I'll stay my ground
I trust my lass, to be well found.

When all others abandon ship, it is customary for the captain to go down with the ship. Ships are customarily referred to as female, hence "lass". Shipwrecks are often discovered quickly if they are near their last known position, or even years later upon exploration of the deep. ...Alternate interpretation just for fun -- if we are talking the ship, if ALL leave, she may stay afloat (ghost ship) and she may be recognized in part by her figurehead.

Clue reworked for the sake of completion re: check into "well found" again comment by OP:

A "well deck" is one that is found lower than what you'd normally identify the ship's profile by. As such, once the ship goes down, you may be likely to find it on its side, or upside down, with the well deck more exposed than normal.

Wrong again. Ah well. OP provided a definition:

well found: adj. (chiefly of a boat) well equipped and maintained.

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  • $\begingroup$ You've got the check for this answer - but check into "well found" again. $\endgroup$ – Khale_Kitha Apr 11 '16 at 16:23
  • $\begingroup$ @Khale_Kitha Got it? $\endgroup$ – feelinferrety Apr 11 '16 at 17:29
  • $\begingroup$ It's a lot simpler than you think. No wordplay, on that particular line - google.com/#q=%22well+found%22 $\endgroup$ – Khale_Kitha Apr 11 '16 at 17:30
  • $\begingroup$ @Khale_Kitha Ah, a google of "ship well found" just got me a bunch of shipwreck discoveries. XD $\endgroup$ – feelinferrety Apr 11 '16 at 17:33
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I think it is:

A ship

I'll leave my slip behind you see

Leave the Slipway behind when sailing

And the dress comes off when it's only me

The ships anchor is deployed when not sailing and crew members are not on board

The proper fathom's set to my draft

?

Or else I'll find another craft

Or else it will sink and become a home to marine life

The men I know, they toe the line,

Crew members have to follow the rules of the ship. Toe the line = obey the rules/principles

Or else they'll learn to drink the brine

Or else the ship will sink

If they do leave, I'll stay my ground I trust my lass, to be well found

Another anchor reference. And a nice way to end as it started with the Anchor.

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    $\begingroup$ Maybe google windlass, ship's dress, meaning of littoral, origin of the expression "toe the line", and draft as it relates to a ship. Fathom, of course, is the maritime measure of depth. Maybe also "well found" as it relates to ships but I think that's understood. $\endgroup$ – Hugh Meyers Apr 10 '16 at 8:58
  • $\begingroup$ This isn't it, sorry. The reasoning is a bit weak in several areas, as well. $\endgroup$ – Khale_Kitha Apr 10 '16 at 18:37
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A naval crew member?

The dress comes off being dress uniform. the draft being a military draft. The slip being that of the ship or maybe a payslip sent home?

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  • $\begingroup$ I need a more specific answer - and your reasons are very off. Keep looking. $\endgroup$ – Khale_Kitha Apr 9 '16 at 15:07

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