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My first rebus, so I hope that it makes sense.

Given that $f(z)=\dfrac{1}{(z-A)^n}$, is it true that $A=[N,\ldots,O]$?

Hint:

$f$, $n$, and $z$ are not important

Hint:

It's about fruits

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    $\begingroup$ To get started: $A$ is a pole of function $f$. $\endgroup$ – Haobin Apr 1 '16 at 10:05
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The community wiki answer is

No.

Community wiki argument:

1. $A$ is a pole of the function
2. $[N..O]$ is the $N$-$O$-range, respectively the EN-O-RANGE.
3. Now the question is: IS A-POLE EQUAL TO EN-O-RANGE?
4. And the answer is: No, since you cannot compare apples to oranges.

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  • $\begingroup$ oh wow, this is a way better answer than I was expecting out of this puzzle $\endgroup$ – question_asker Apr 4 '16 at 12:25
  • $\begingroup$ Well done! And by the way, what is the community wiki (I'm new here)? $\endgroup$ – fffred Apr 4 '16 at 12:49
  • $\begingroup$ @fffred A community wiki is an answer editable by anyone with a reputation above 100 (Rather than 2000). Wikis do not affect reputation in any way. Here is a link to more info:meta.stackexchange.com/questions/11740/… $\endgroup$ – Redwolf Programs Apr 15 '18 at 14:34
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Another try - is it?

There is no answer - i.e. it cannot be deduced

because

The rebus last line is comparing apples and oranges

as

Apples is A pole (plural as pole of degree n)

and

oranges is 0 (zero) ranges as No is the range or interval.

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  • $\begingroup$ You're almost there. But I'm not sure I understand the reasoning for the latter. Think pronunciation. In any case, what is the answer to "is the following true?" $\endgroup$ – fffred Apr 4 '16 at 11:21
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    $\begingroup$ +1, but I think the latter part is supposed to come from pronouncing "N-O range" $\endgroup$ – Will Apr 4 '16 at 11:36
  • $\begingroup$ I agree with the above comments - that would make a good answer (I couldn't quite get it and I edited my answer a few times already - not sure of the protocol of editing an already posted answer - and thanks also for correcting the format earlier.) $\endgroup$ – Tom Apr 4 '16 at 11:42
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Is it:-

Poles apart ?

Because

$A$ is a pole of the function in variable $z$ and these letters are distant from each other in the alphabet(similar to the poles of a magnet).
It may be noted that a monopole does not exist, so the South and North Pole of a magnet are always some distance apart, howsoever small this distance might be.


So the following (ie.$A=[N\,.\!.\, O]$) is:

False, as $O$ and $N$ are not poles apart(ie. far apart) in the alphabet.

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  • $\begingroup$ Nice idea, but that's not the right answer. $\endgroup$ – fffred Apr 1 '16 at 11:55
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Is it:

An apple a day keeps the doctor away.

Because

Apple is A pole
Doctor away is Dr No separated

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  • $\begingroup$ It's not about Dr No :) $\endgroup$ – fffred Apr 4 '16 at 10:27
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Is it:

A Polar Molecule?

So the following (ie.$A=[N..O]$) is :

True, as $[N..O]$ (read as $N$ to $O$),ie. $N_2O$ is a polar molecule.

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  • $\begingroup$ Another interesting interpretation! The one I'm thinking about still has a better match. $\endgroup$ – fffred Apr 1 '16 at 15:01

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