1
$\begingroup$

A while ago, I was watching a video about teaching children to count when these challenges suddenly occurred to me. Note that they may be easy in other languages (eg. in German you have: eins, zwei, drei which will solve the last one) so I’m limiting the answers to English only.

  1. Think of a number beginning with “t”.

  2. Think of a number beginning with “o”.

  3. Think of a number beginning with “p”.

  4. Think of a number beginning with “m”.

  5. Think of a number beginning with “z”.

Edit: Also, all numbers are less than a billion.

$\endgroup$
2
  • 5
    $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is not a puzzle. $\endgroup$
    – Deusovi
    Commented Mar 28, 2016 at 12:12
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ The point about this was that it was meant to be a deflection for those who like to think naturally. $\endgroup$
    – Shuri2060
    Commented Mar 28, 2016 at 12:18

2 Answers 2

5
$\begingroup$

What about

the number pi ($\pi$). It has a constant value but still it's a number.

$\endgroup$
4
  • $\begingroup$ Yes - that was the one I was looking for (pi). The point of the puzzle was that it was meant to trick the reader into thinking natural numbers. $\endgroup$
    – Shuri2060
    Commented Mar 28, 2016 at 12:21
  • $\begingroup$ You probably mean pi, not pie. $\endgroup$
    – dpwilson
    Commented Mar 28, 2016 at 12:21
  • $\begingroup$ Corrected the spelling. Blame the Auto complete $\endgroup$ Commented Mar 28, 2016 at 12:23
  • $\begingroup$ I selected this answer, as this was the main heart of the challenges, whilst the others were just deflections. $\endgroup$
    – Shuri2060
    Commented Mar 28, 2016 at 12:35
6
$\begingroup$

Two; one; pentillion; million; zero.

$\endgroup$
7
  • $\begingroup$ Not pentillion. $\endgroup$
    – Shuri2060
    Commented Mar 28, 2016 at 12:15
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @QuestionAsker: I answered your question. What else do you want? $\endgroup$
    – Deusovi
    Commented Mar 28, 2016 at 12:15
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @QuestionAsker: I'm confused. It's a number beginning with p - what's wrong with it? $\endgroup$
    – Deusovi
    Commented Mar 28, 2016 at 12:17
  • $\begingroup$ There's nothing wrong with it - except it wasn't the number I was looking for. I didn't see that loophole so I edited the question. $\endgroup$
    – Shuri2060
    Commented Mar 28, 2016 at 12:18
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @Deusovi is pentillion even in use anywhere? "Quintillion" is the one I'm familiar with, and I'm only seeing pentillion in a list of proposed number-words (and anyone can propose something) $\endgroup$ Commented Mar 28, 2016 at 13:01

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.