2
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Ask me for directions and I will point in 5 directions
Stop me pointing, I am vermin reincarnated
I may be nocturnal and prefer the dark
But stop and look where my first point points
You'll see me out shining bright
Mix and add 19 and 20 and you're back where it starts
But just remember I know what you like

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  • $\begingroup$ is it possibly a star? $\endgroup$ – DemonicBirdFlu Mar 21 '16 at 19:17
  • $\begingroup$ possibly, ill need some reasons $\endgroup$ – Beastly Gerbil Mar 21 '16 at 19:18
4
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Ask me for directions and I will point in 5 directions

A five-pointed star?

Stop me pointing, I am vermin reincarnated

Turned around, STAR becomes RATS

I may be nocturnal and prefer the dark

Most often, you can only see the stars at night

But stop and look where my first point points
You'll see me out shining bright

The top point of a star points either up or North, skyward (where stars, including but not limited to the Sun, are seen) or to the north star.

Mix and add 19 and 20 and you're back where it starts

the 19th and 20th letters are S and T; mix them and add to the end and you've got STARTS

But just remember I know what you like

On a number of websites as well as in real life, you can use a star to indicate that you like something (Here on Puzzling, it's right below the voting buttons; on Twitter it was the indicator for a Favorite, but has been replaced by the heart)

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  • $\begingroup$ give this man the correct answer and call it a day $\endgroup$ – DemonicBirdFlu Mar 21 '16 at 19:20
  • $\begingroup$ @DemonicBirdFlu It might not be right! I still don't know what the last line means, and I'm not even totally sure about the 2nd-to-last $\endgroup$ – question_asker Mar 21 '16 at 19:21
  • $\begingroup$ 1 + 4 + 1 + 5 = 11. A star has 10 vertices... if you visit each vertex and continue to the first you have visited 11 vertices. $\endgroup$ – George Reith Mar 21 '16 at 19:21
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @GeorgeReith I'm a little confused by this - where is the 11 coming from (that is, aside from your equation and your explanation)? $\endgroup$ – question_asker Mar 21 '16 at 19:23
  • $\begingroup$ @question_asker You count the first one twice because you go back to the start $\endgroup$ – George Reith Mar 21 '16 at 19:24

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