-1
$\begingroup$

Without any restriction, can a single sentence be written or spoken using the words "to", "too", and "two" in the same sentence consecutively used (one after the other) and be proper?

Please explain and write your example sentence if this is possible.

$\endgroup$

closed as off-topic by Deusovi, manshu, Aza Feb 23 '16 at 17:29

  • This question does not appear to be about creation and solving of puzzles, within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

migrated from english.stackexchange.com Feb 23 '16 at 14:04

This question came from our site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts.

  • 3
    $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is not a puzzle or related to puzzling. $\endgroup$ – Deusovi Feb 23 '16 at 16:14
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ @Deusovi In any case, they migrated from the other site and thought it more appropriately belongs here instead. I started it where I felt it was appropriate to put it and then the moderators there told me otherwise. I really do not care what you all do with it at this point so feel free to do as you wish... my perspective was this is a simple question related to English and too simple and to puzzling for English so they moved it here. It sounds like moderators need to ensure the questions are appropriate before being moved to other communities. $\endgroup$ – Facebook Feb 23 '16 at 16:18
9
$\begingroup$

Peter: I won the game! I got to 2 points first!
Paul: But I got to two too!

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ I like the question, so I will add another permutation. "I'm giving two candies to all the trick-or-treaters with cute costumes." "Well, don't give two to too many or we'll run out." $\endgroup$ – Hugh Meyers Feb 26 '16 at 15:55
  • $\begingroup$ Or how about "The Leafs beat the Blackhawks." "They beat the Bruins too: two to one." Then: "I gave away all my spare change." "Me too, to two guys on the street corner." That's four out of the six possible permutations of the three words. The question is now whether any permutation of the three is not possible. $\endgroup$ – Hugh Meyers Feb 26 '16 at 16:11
  • $\begingroup$ "I had to upchuck after the party." "I had to too, two times." $\endgroup$ – Hugh Meyers Feb 26 '16 at 16:16
9
$\begingroup$

"I think the number six horse ate an apple before the race."

"I saw them give one to two too."

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.