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I'm a new fan of cubing. I've recently bought a speed cube and for now I have only mastered the beginner's method and solve it in barely a minute and a half (which is way over what a speedcuber is supposed to do).
So I'm wondering, is there any recommended method to learn after the beginner's method in order to improve my time ?

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  • $\begingroup$ While still slower than a typical speed cuber, you can bring your time down to ~40sec using your current method with nothing more than repetition. $\endgroup$ – mchoy25 Feb 19 '16 at 19:12
  • $\begingroup$ There are different methods to learn after the Beginner's Method, but the most commonly used one is CFOP. Btw, I can recommend checking out the Cubers-reddit if you have any more questions and to meet other people with the same hobby. :) $\endgroup$ – Kevin Cruijssen May 20 '16 at 7:34
  • $\begingroup$ @Chowzen Vaseline is really really bad for speedcubes - it eats the plastic away and although it may seem okay and smoother initially, your cube will eventually be unusable. Rubik's brand cubes have really tough plastic, so the vaseline method works fine with them to speed up the breaking in process, but for speedcubes vaseline is a big no. $\endgroup$ – Irregular User May 20 '16 at 8:34
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I agree with @mchoy25 that you can bring your time down much more. Things like single finger turning, properly lubricating the cube, and knowing what the back of the cube looks like without rotating the cube will improve your time much more than switching algorithms. That said, if you want to switch to more complicated methods then I'd look up F2L. Basically, from beginner to master you'll just be reducing the number of steps taken while massively increasing the number of possible algorithms to perform/memorize for any given step

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If you want to go for speedcubing, it's NOT recommended to learn the beginner's method at all. You end up trying to unlearn the bad habits that you picked up from the beginner's method. However, the most commonly learnt speedcubing method (and hence has a lot of resources available for it) after the beginner's method is the Fridrich method. In less than a couple of weeks you should be sub 40 easily.

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  • $\begingroup$ in the question it says they already learned beginner's method >.> $\endgroup$ – TrojanByAccident Aug 28 '17 at 15:26
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, and that's quite a shame. $\endgroup$ – Irregular User Aug 28 '17 at 15:27
  • $\begingroup$ you're not going to find someone who can speedcube but hasn't learned the beginner's method $\endgroup$ – TrojanByAccident Aug 28 '17 at 15:29
  • $\begingroup$ False - I personally taught a large group of people to speedcube, most of which reached sub 40 within a month, and all of whom had never touched a cube before. Perhaps you meant that you couldn't find someone that fit your criteria. $\endgroup$ – Irregular User Aug 28 '17 at 15:31

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