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A monarch in democracy,
yet revered without hypocrisy,
my name shall live on evermore.

Under the same reign as the sign of war,
and thirty-one's twenty-four,
the first to seize a third at three.

Totaling thirteen and a little more,
I became the one to do it, finally;
I'm now a monarch doubly.

Who am I?

Hint #1

The answer is not a political figure

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  • $\begingroup$ I'm kind of annoyed that I can make more of the clues fit to Kobe Bryant than LeBron James $\endgroup$ – question_asker Feb 3 '16 at 15:33
  • $\begingroup$ @question_asker You may be going down a decent path! $\endgroup$ – Will Feb 3 '16 at 15:41
  • $\begingroup$ is it a "who" or can it be a combination of "who"s ? $\endgroup$ – canova Feb 4 '16 at 11:42
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My guess is

American Pharoah (sic) the horse that recently won the Triple Crown.

A monarch in democracy,

Pharaohs were monarchs, but the U.S. is a democracy.

yet revered without hypocrisy,

He's a horse, not a political figure.

my name shall live on evermore.

Triple Crown winners are rare enough to be famous as long as people keep racing horses.

Under the same reign as the sign of war,

Not sure about this one; I think it's a reference to the zodiac, but I don't see a connection. Maybe a reference to War Admiral, a previous Triple Crown winner? Could either refer to his jockey also riding War Eagle, a previous contender, or his lineage, as he is a descendant of War Admiral and Man O' War, among other notable thoroughbreds.

and thirty-one's twenty-four,

A possible reference to Secretariat's 1973 win by 31 lengths.

the first to seize a third at three.

His jockey, Victor Espinoza, was the first to ride 3 different Triple Crown horses, winning it on his third attempt.

Totaling thirteen and a little more,

Refers to the how many lengths he won by, over the 3 races. 1 + 7 + 5 1/2.

I became the one to do it, finally;

Referring to being the first Triple Crown winner in 37 years.

I'm now a monarch doubly.

Both from his name and the Triple Crown.

Credit to regan for help on lines 4 and 6, Herb Wolfe on line 7, question_asker, whose comment about LeBron James and Kobe Bryant got me thinking about sports, and Big Black Box, who corrected the name's spelling.

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  • 2
    $\begingroup$ I think "the same reign" may be a play on words. A very clever one. Not sure I should say more in comments without a spoiler tag. $\endgroup$ – Regan Feb 3 '16 at 22:27
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    $\begingroup$ I'm not sure if this is what OP intended, but you definitely misspelled his name (yes, you'll think you won't but you did - check it), so technically this answer is incorrect. :-) $\endgroup$ – user17947 Feb 4 '16 at 2:04
  • $\begingroup$ @BigBlackBox Arg, and I double checked the spelling of pharaoh, too! $\endgroup$ – DylanSp Feb 4 '16 at 2:29
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    $\begingroup$ Now I have a bit more time I wanted to expand on my previous comment: the jockey who rode this horse, Victor Espinoza, also rode War Emblem ("under the same reign/rein as a sign of war") and he is the first jockey to have three attempts at the Triple Crown (seize the third at three). I think 31's 24 probably refers to another horse ridden by Espinoza too, though I don't know which. $\endgroup$ – Regan Feb 4 '16 at 2:39
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    $\begingroup$ I believe 31's 24 refers to the horse "California Chrome". California was the 31st state to be recognised, and Chromium is element number 24 in the periodic table. $\endgroup$ – Block Feb 6 '16 at 6:30
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My guess is

George Washington

A monarch in democracy, yet revered without hypocrisy, my name shall live on evermore.

Many wanted him to be king of the United States, and he is consistently ranked as one of the top presidents in opinion polls.

Under the same rule as the sign of war, and thirty-one's twenty-four, the first to seize a third at three.

I'm unsure on this part, but I think it has to do with him being the Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army. Third of three may refer to his third appearance on a 3 cent US postage stamp.

Totaling thirteen and a little more, I became the one to do it, finally.

He was first president under the Constitution, which was ratified by the original 13 colonies. A little more could refer to the fact that he was the only one who has been unanimously elected.

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  • $\begingroup$ This is a great answer! Welcome to Puzzling.SE - I hope to see you around more! c: $\endgroup$ – Deusovi Feb 3 '16 at 4:37
  • $\begingroup$ This was my first thought was well, a note on first to seize a third at three: I thought it came from the fact that Washington was appointed head of the Army 3 times (1775, 1798, 1976) but General of the Armies of the United States (ie. all US Military forces) only once (1976) - as technically the first appointment was Commander and Chief of the Continental Armies $\endgroup$ – LinkBerest Feb 4 '16 at 2:41
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    $\begingroup$ Yep, that is not a typo. He was promoted as both a part of the bi-centinial celebration and to fix the discrepancy that our first and most important general was only considered a mid-ranked general by modern ranking $\endgroup$ – LinkBerest Feb 4 '16 at 2:50
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I couldn't find anything better than

Napoléon Bonaparte

A monarch in democracy, yet revered without hypocrisy, my name shall live on evermore.

France was a democratic country when he was the emperor but he preferred monarchy (Source). As wikipedia states "there would be an heir, it would also make it all but impossible to change the regime by assassinating Napoleon." (Source)

Under the same rule as the sign of war, and thirty-one's twenty-four, the first to seize a third at three.

He got some victories in The War of Third Coalition which started in 1803 (second paragraph here)

Totaling thirteen and a little more, I became the one to do it, finally.

He created eighteen Marshals of the Empire from amongst his top generals to secure the allegiance of the army (another link). His victories led to the worldwide expansion of French revolutionary ideals and reforms

However my answer cannot explain thirty-one's twenty-four which I thought to be some kind of date.

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  • $\begingroup$ Interesting guess! Not the answer, though. $\endgroup$ – Will Feb 2 '16 at 6:28
  • $\begingroup$ @Will is thirty-one's twenty-four a date? $\endgroup$ – manshu Feb 2 '16 at 7:35
  • $\begingroup$ Nope, not a date. $\endgroup$ – Will Feb 2 '16 at 7:40
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My guess is that you are

The Ace of Spades

A monarch in democracy, yet revered without hypocrisy, my name shall live on evermore.

The top valued card in the pack of cards. Most famous of all the cards.

Under the same reign as the sign of war,

The suit spades is the aggressive suit traditionally, similar to the sign of Ares

and thirty-one's twenty-four,

both card games, the game 24 includes the ace but is played without any of the face cards.

the first to seize a third at three.

Not sure of this reference, possibly a reference to 9 o'clock, 12 o'clock, 3 o'clock dealing or placing of tarrot cards?

Totaling thirteen and a little more, I became the one to do it, finally; I'm now a monarch doubly.

Aces can be high and low, big card or one.

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