2
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What is the missing grid like? I just cannot recognize any rule.enter image description here

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4
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Something like this would make sense.

enter image description here

So

The middle is mirrored along the diagonal and the outer are moved diagonally downright. Of course, there are many variations to this. It could be the upper that is always is moved downright diagonally and the lower that is mirrored along the diagonal, but that would produce an overlap.

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  • $\begingroup$ I think the second alternative solution is better. There are two separate groups of 3 grids in each. The spatial relationship maybe includes the information what the left sided grids must do other words the middle one should do the two different transformation because it is logically connnected with both others on the right column..but i am not sure either. Otherwise both of your ideas seem to be logical $\endgroup$ – user18447 Jan 21 '16 at 14:32
  • $\begingroup$ This is the problem with this kind of puzzles... $\endgroup$ – Carl Löndahl Jan 21 '16 at 14:53
  • $\begingroup$ Yes but maybe the second makes more sense. If you see the five as a whole than symmetry (the middle one has one function towards both right sided grids) would make sense but the 5 grids as a whole does noy exist as a consistent pattern. So it is contradictory. Secondly if you see the right side functions as a sequence,from up to down translation, flipping, who knows what the function of the bottom one will be...it is already logical speculation but more things says that the overlap is the better one compaired with the reasons that prioritizes the first solution $\endgroup$ – user18447 Jan 21 '16 at 15:06
  • $\begingroup$ Or we are on wrong track..😆 this is possible if there are two solutions and it is such hard to make a difference. These puzzles usually have a unique one where you are not in doubt, and this means the solution is purely not yet found. $\endgroup$ – user18447 Jan 21 '16 at 15:11

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