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This is my first rebus. The titre is a crue.


enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

Hint

Note the knowledge tag. You may have to use your internet savvy to solve this. Depending on what you know of course!

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  • $\begingroup$ A crue, or a clue? $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Aug 14 '15 at 23:44
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    $\begingroup$ The crue is itself a clue $\endgroup$ – Engineer Toast Aug 15 '15 at 5:12
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How about

Roger Wilco and out

In order, the clues are:

Roger Rabbit.
The band Wilco.
Ampersand means "and".
Someone being thrown out

The clue in the title is

"We're f***l***ying here" because " roger wilco and out" is pilot jargon.

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  • $\begingroup$ Nice! I noticed Chasly said [redacted - the answer] in a comment recently, but then edited it to say something different with the same meaning - that must have been when he got the idea for this puzzle. $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Aug 15 '15 at 11:52
  • $\begingroup$ Haha! Yes indeed. That was the very moment. $\endgroup$ – chasly from UK Aug 15 '15 at 11:56
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    $\begingroup$ You mean "pirot jargon"? $\endgroup$ – Joe Z. Aug 15 '15 at 15:16
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I've accepted ET's answer. If anyone is interested in my thought processes when creating the puzzle, here you are.

Answer

Roger, Wilco and Out. (note all initial caps - as per standard notation)

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The eccentric spelling comes from the first character's speech pattern on the site where I got the picture. A slight wabbity wisp fwom Woger.

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"Rebus arone!" - When converted by substituting l for r, we get something that sounds like ""Leave us alone". The phrase Roger, Wilco and Out, does mean that in a sense. It translates to "Okay, Will do, and Leave us alone, we're fine now."

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We're flying here! - This a clue to the fact it is flying jargon when speaking to ATC or another pilot.

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The hint about internet savvy. I'm sure most people on a puzzling site know this already, however, for anyone who hasn't discovered it yet, you can search online using images. Thus, if you don't recognise a picture, you can often find it online. In the case of Wilco, for example, you would have found both the picture and the name of the band.

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  • $\begingroup$ The problem with that "wabbity wisp" is that it's also a stereotypical Far-Eastern "accent". $\endgroup$ – Joe Z. Aug 15 '15 at 15:19
  • $\begingroup$ Are you saying that no speech idiosyncrasy should ever be used in fictional writing? Not even with respect to a cartoon character? That would be very restrictive. I had no thoughts of anything Far-Eastern and there is zero suggestion in any of my clues of anyone who is far-Eastern. Can you find anything other than in your own preconceptions (which I personally disown) that I wrote that suggests I intended that? $\endgroup$ – chasly from UK Aug 15 '15 at 15:54
  • $\begingroup$ For the record, my immediate thought (and nothing I saw in the puzzle gave any indication otherwise) was also that it was meant to mimick especially Japanese people being stereotypically unable to distinguish /r/ and /l/. I’ve never heard Roger Rabbit have any such characteristic in his speech—he frequently pronounces both /r/ and /l/ as /w/, but I’ve never heard him pronounce /l/ as /r/. Until I read your comment here, I didn’t understand where the Japanese aspect fit into the puzzle. $\endgroup$ – Janus Bahs Jacquet Aug 17 '15 at 21:25
  • $\begingroup$ Well, I'm not sure what I can do. I didn't see it that way at all. I first thought of the phrase, Roger, Wilco and Out. Next, I found the pictures, then I wanted to put the word 'rebus' in the title'. I noticed that 'rebus' sounds something like 'leave us' which, in turn means 'Out'. This gave me the idea to change other words to match and when I watched a short cartoon I noticed the rabbit speaking a little bit like that. I would be interested to hear from anyone who it actually affects. If necessary I can change it. $\endgroup$ – chasly from UK Aug 17 '15 at 21:35
  • $\begingroup$ Note: This reminds me a little of the woman who complained that the delivery man was whistling dirty songs. The problem was in her mind not in that of the person who was whistling. $\endgroup$ – chasly from UK Aug 17 '15 at 21:39

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