7
$\begingroup$

Who am I talking about? Try to explain each part.

During the square, it was a quite common thing that he said. And lets not forget to chastise the howling canine(of sorts).

During the third to six and eight, it was in French. And out goes the flower and in with the secretary and Shakespeare's friend.

During the odious number, if you added a certain cheese, it became a mouse. Impossibility works quite well for a mnemonic device. Also, remember the stagnant water left years past.

Once, arguably, a perfect trinity: three as one and one as three. But along came the dinosaur, and coughed up a little something and then the three became four.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Is each stanza a different characteristic of the person you're talking about? I know it seems kinda obvious but I just need to make sure. I have a preliminary idea about one of them but if my idea were right they wouldn't all be about the same person $\endgroup$ – Moose Aug 12 '15 at 17:54
  • $\begingroup$ Oh dear, I shouldn't have said that before. I'll edit it a bit. Here you go, perfectly valid answer: yes, no, it's quite complicated. Mostly yes. $\endgroup$ – AJL Aug 12 '15 at 18:28
  • $\begingroup$ Shakespeare's friend ... Francis Bacon? Baconian cipher? $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Aug 12 '15 at 19:06
  • $\begingroup$ Not codes or ciphers in this, though I would expect you to know the "trivia" part without needing to look it up. $\endgroup$ – AJL Aug 12 '15 at 19:27
5
$\begingroup$

The Doctor, specifically from the newer Doctor Who series. The first 3 blocks are catch phrases and companions. His name is his promise.

Piece-by piece:

During the square, it was a quite common thing that he said. And lets not forget to chastise the howling canine(of sorts).

9 is a square, "Fantastic!" is the common thing. Bad Wolf/Rose is the "howling canine".

During the third to six and eight, it was in French. And out goes the flower and in with the secretary and Shakespeare's friend.

10 could be third in this sequence (6, 8, 10)? I'm least confident about that part. "Allons-y" was 10's catchphrase, in French. Rose, Donna, and Martha are the flower, secretary (temp), and "Shakespeare's friend", respectively.

During the odious number, if you added a certain cheese, it became a mouse. Impossibility works quite well for a mnemonic device. Also, remember the stagnant water left years past.

11 is an odious number (It has an odd number of 1s when written in binary). "Geronimo" is the catchphrase, Stilton is a cheese and Geronimo Stilton is a mouse from a series of childrens' books. Clara is "The Impossible Girl" and Amy Pond is "stagnant water left years past", a combination of her name and ultimate fate.

Once, arguably, a perfect trinity: three as one and one as three. But along came the dinosaur, and coughed up a little something and then the three became four.

The Twelfth Doctor is the fourth of the new series. His first full episode had the Tardis swallowed and spat out by a dinosaur.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Hooray! Good job $\endgroup$ – AJL Aug 18 '15 at 22:08
3
$\begingroup$

Is the answer:

Sherlock Holmes

During the square, it was a quite common thing that he said.

Trafalgar Square appears in several of Doyle's works. "Elementary, my dear Watson"?

And lets not forget to chastise the howling canine(of sorts).

The Hound of the Baskervilles

During the third to six and eight, it was in French.

Not too sure about this one.

And out goes the flower and in with the secretary and Shakespeare's friend.

Not too sure about flower. Are you referring to The Italian Secretary, the novel? As for Shakespeare's friend, Doyle often has Holmes quote his plays - and respects Shakespeare's writings immensely.

During the odious number, if you added a certain cheese, it became a mouse.

Steamboat Willie was voted 13th (the odious number) greatest cartoon. Also, Mickey Mouse became Sherlock Mouse in another comic.

Impossibility works quite well for a mnemonic device.

He's often quoted with "Once you've eliminated the impossible...." The mnemonic device seems to tie into the "stagnant water" bit.

Also, remember the stagnant water left years past.

A lake may have stagnant waters, and HOMES is a mnemonic device for the great lakes (Huron, Ontario, Michigan, Erie, Superior).

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ No, but the real answer is the tiniest bit related. $\endgroup$ – AJL Aug 12 '15 at 23:11
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I know the OP said this was incorrect, but +1 for sweet explanations. $\endgroup$ – NeedAName Aug 18 '15 at 18:29

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.