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My little sister came up with this riddle:

Preposition, adverb, and suffix too,
It relates in every situation to you.

Veggies of the ground or fruit of a brood,
Drop the first letter of the scrumptious food.

A master of writing and founder of fear,
Whose works are always lurking near.

The seeing spots on the face of a bird,
Is an epithet for the shortened word.

The word is important in farms or magazines,
It means what it says and says what it means.

I'll give it some time and if no one has solved it, I'll get her to write a hint.

Good luck!

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  • $\begingroup$ Is "veggies of the ground of fruit of a brood" correct? $\endgroup$ – Bailey M Jul 24 '15 at 14:31
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    $\begingroup$ Well the answer I'm getting is "shit potatoes (Stephen) king cock-eyed spread" but I'm thinking that's not what it is. I chose Stephen King because he wrote the Thing, and things are everywhere. Also potatoes are the only vegetables I find scrumptious, and I think they count as root vegetables. $\endgroup$ – Kingrames Jul 24 '15 at 14:40
  • $\begingroup$ Sorry my bad, I was thinking of "It" by Stephen King, I think it was John Carpenter that wrote The Thing. King also wrote "the Bad Place". I remember this because I used to joke about his next title being "That thing over there next to the scary stuff." $\endgroup$ – Kingrames Jul 24 '15 at 14:49
  • $\begingroup$ James Herbert wrote "Rats" and you're never far from one. $\endgroup$ – Gordon K Jul 24 '15 at 15:26
  • $\begingroup$ This is very clever! A charming, solid riddle. $\endgroup$ – dennisdeems Jul 24 '15 at 17:41
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Okay, I am certain I have the answer, but I'm having trouble making some of the clues fit.

The answer is

onomatopoeia

Preposition, adverb, and suffix too,
It relates in every situation to you.

"on" is a preposition, adverb, and suffix. Not sure about the second line.

Veggies of the ground or fruit of a brood,
Drop the first letter of the scrumptious food.

"Tomato" is the answer to the first line. Drop the "t" and you get "omato"

A master of writing and founder of fear,
Whose works are always lurking near.

Who else but Edgar Allen "Poe"?

The seeing spots on the face of a bird,
Is an epithet for the shortened word.

Iowa is considered a "flyover" state, and someone flying over it would have a "bird's eye" view of it. The abbreviation for Iowa is "IA".

The word is important in farms or magazines,
It means what it says and says what it means.

This stanza is a reference to onomatopoeia as a whole. Farm animal noises are described using onomatopoeia ("Pig goes oink, cow goes moo"), and the second line is basically a straight definition of onomatopoeia! Not sure about magazines, though, unless it's a reference to gun magazines and sounds like "Bang!"

The clues I'm not sure about are "It relates in every situation to you", "fruit of a brood", "Whose works are always lurking near", and "magazines".

Any help on filling in blanks would be appreciated, but I would be shocked if this isn't the answer.

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    $\begingroup$ Brilliant solution! $\endgroup$ – dennisdeems Jul 24 '15 at 16:42
  • $\begingroup$ The second line may refer to the French "on", which translates to "you" in English when used as a universal pronoun -- as in "you never can tell". $\endgroup$ – dennisdeems Jul 24 '15 at 17:04
  • $\begingroup$ @dennisdeems "on" means "us" or "we", not "you" in French $\endgroup$ – TroyAndAbed Jul 24 '15 at 17:17
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    $\begingroup$ @TroyAndAbed "We never know" is not idiomatic in English. A literal rendering would be "One never knows", but that's unsuitable for any but the most stiffly formal context. In everyday speech, "you never know" is what most English-speakers would say. $\endgroup$ – dennisdeems Jul 24 '15 at 17:26
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    $\begingroup$ I think the entire last stanza must be a reference to the whole word (onomatopoeia describes the sounds farm animals make, not sure about magazines, though), which means the 4th stanza must reference "ia", not just "i". $\endgroup$ – VictorHenry Jul 24 '15 at 20:40
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Still working on .. But I think I have got the first two.

Up

Like

E.g. Suffix - Whats'up? Sup?

And

Preposition - Ran Up Adverb - Looked up

Preposition, adverb, and suffix too, It relates in every situation to you.

Veggies of the ground or fruit of a brood, Drop the first letter of the scrumptious food.

Melon -> Elon

A master of writing and founder of fear, Whose works are always lurking near.

Writing -> Dean Koontz -> Darkness

The seeing spots on the face of a bird, Is an epithet for the shortened word.

Eyes -> I's

The word is important in farms or magazines, It means what it says and says what it means.

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    $\begingroup$ how does the suffix "me" relate to "relate in every situation to you"? $\endgroup$ – Olivier Poulin Jul 24 '15 at 15:04
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    $\begingroup$ I'm not sure I can figure out how to use me as a preposition or adverb, either. $\endgroup$ – Set Big O Jul 24 '15 at 15:06
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    $\begingroup$ Perhaps kanchirk is a pirate? "Avast, look at me pirating" might have the word me considered an adverb... $\endgroup$ – Kingrames Jul 24 '15 at 15:08

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