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I was given this puzzle:

Eight friends (Romil, Ramesh, Rakesh, Rohit, Rahul, Abhijeet, Abhishek and Anil) are sitting around a circular table, but not necessarily in the same order. Four of them are facing inside and the other four are facing outside.

All eight friends belong to eight different cities: Bhopal, Patna, Kolkata, Delhi, Gwalior, Bengluru, Chennai and Rajkot - but not necessarily in the same order.

Rohit belongs to Kolkata and faces the person who belongs to Bengluru.

Can I interpret from the final sentence that both Rohit and the Bangalore guy are facing towards the centre?

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This is an Einstein's puzzle. The answer to your question is no, we cannot definitively make the statement that both Rohit and the Bangalore guy are facing inward. To be able to make such a statement, we need more information about the other friends involved.

For example, let's assume Ramesh is from Bangalore and Romil, Rakesh, Abhijeet are also facing inward apart from Rohit. This would mean Ramesh is facing outward, since there are already four people facing inward.

A counter example, let's assume Ramesh is from Bangalore and Romil, Rakesh, Abhijeet, Rahul are facing outward. This would mean that Ramesh cannot be facing outward as that would violate the condition that half the friends are facing inward. Hence, in this scenario Ramesh is facing inward.

Both the above assumptions are valid, considering the information provided. Hence, we cannot definitively determine which direction the Bangalore guy is facing. To be able to make such a statement definitively, we need some more information regarding the friends' positions, the direction some of them are facing, their cities or their positions relative to each other.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you so much.That's what i wanted to know.Any tricks to solve these puzzles fast? $\endgroup$ – vipin sharma Jul 2 '15 at 11:49
  • $\begingroup$ @vipinsharma: For starters, some more information is needed. Once you have enough information, this puzzle can be solved. Refer to this answer to see how such puzzles are solved. $\endgroup$ – CodeNewbie Jul 2 '15 at 11:52

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