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Possibly a star,
A monthly child.
Sometimes weighty,
Sometimes liberated.

Hint:

lines 3 and 4 each give a type, not a feature, property or state, of the entity suggested by each of lines 1 and 2, and that entity is the answer

Further hint:

what stars do you know of?

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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ People are voting to close on the grounds of there being too many possible answers without knowing the intended answer and how it fits and therefore without a good basis to compare it for goodness of fit with all those possible but unintended answers they believe in the existence of. I suggest waiting until someone solves it. $\endgroup$ – h34 May 26 '15 at 1:12
  • $\begingroup$ It's on hold now. No there aren't too many possible answers, and no, the good answer would not be too long for this format. I can't argue in support of that statement without revealing the answer. But unlike the vote to closers, I do know what the intended answer is. Five wrongs don't make a right. Asking me to add details seems rather off the wall. $\endgroup$ – h34 May 26 '15 at 1:29
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    $\begingroup$ I think the problem is that it's so short and the use of "sometimes". Lots of things are sometimes weighty and sometimes liberated based on the ambiguity of the words (and they are nearly antonyms), which pretty much lowers your puzzle down to the top two lines. As seen in the current answers, there are a few things that fit pretty well. I'm sure the intended answer fits better than the rest, but I think puzzles like this need intended answers that do more than "fit better". $\endgroup$ – MisterEman22 May 26 '15 at 2:53
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    $\begingroup$ Imagine I asked "it's green, it's on the left, it cost more, and everyone loves it." The answer is a particular item - one house in a row of houses in a particular city, or one car in a national ad for cars or the like. It fits perfectly. Thing is, the clues don't lead you to the solution, and lots of other things fit that too. The perfection of your solution isn't relevant. I suggest you edit your question to include some sort of hints or context that would eliminate many of the guesses you're seeing and make this a solvable riddle. Then it can be reopened. $\endgroup$ – Kate Gregory May 26 '15 at 11:48
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    $\begingroup$ @h34: I'm voting to reopen this question, but I would suggest adding a hint or two so that it doesn't get closed again. As can be picked up on by the current guesses, the range of possible answers is very large, and whittling it down will help greatly. $\endgroup$ – Bailey M May 26 '15 at 13:04
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I think I got it.

The answer is:

Mason

Possibly a star,

It MAY be a SUN

A monthly child.

MAY SON

Sometimes weighty,

Stonemason (type of mason)

Sometimes liberated.

Freemason (also type of mason)

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  • $\begingroup$ Well done! This was an experiment with varying the Ximenean standards for setting crossword clues. I played with similar-sounding words giving no signal but using duplication for reinforcement, gave no literal clue for the whole word, suggested a wrong alley (rasta, anagram of a star), used pairs of lines each with the same structure, and intended lines 3-4 to give strong confirmation once a solver had had an aha. I'd be interested to hear about your thought processes, VictorHenry. $\endgroup$ – h34 May 27 '15 at 6:44
  • $\begingroup$ Your clues were pretty key for me, actually. I got stuck on "sun" as the star, and "free" as a synonym for liberated. "Free sun" immediately made me think of "freemason", and everything just kind of fell into place from there. I had trouble with the "monthly child" clue for a bit because I was trying to come at it from the angle of "ma" being an abbreviation for "monthly", except i couldn't find any record of anybody ever using it in that way. Then I sort of stumbled into "May Son" and the first clue came with it. $\endgroup$ – VictorHenry May 27 '15 at 8:10
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It is:

Libra constellation.

Possibly a star,

The ruling planet of Libra(Zodiac) is Venus, one of the brightest objects in the night sky (even though Venus itself is not part of the constellation) - or it might just be referring to the faint stars that make up the constellation.

A monthly child.

It is the zodiac sign for those born between September 23rd and October 22nd

Sometimes weighty, Sometimes liberated.

Libra represents Scales/Justice etc...

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    $\begingroup$ Very nice interpretation of lines 2-4, especially how you get weighty and liberated into the same semantic field. But the required interpretation of line 1 is far less contrived than saying 'possibly a star' to mean either a planet or a constellation. $\endgroup$ – h34 May 26 '15 at 0:52
  • $\begingroup$ Wait. You're saying this isn't the answer? $\endgroup$ – Beska May 26 '15 at 14:51
  • $\begingroup$ I agree with OP that it doesn't fit the first line very well - I'm sure the answer will seem obvious to everyone when it's found. (A hint could help though :P ) $\endgroup$ – Spacemonkey May 26 '15 at 14:59
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The answer:

The moon

Explanation

Possibly a star

The moon, to the non-scientific eye, could be seen as a star, having all the visual characteristics

A monthly child

The moon wanes and waxes and hence becomes "a child" on a monthly basis ("A young moon")

Sometimes weighty

At its peak of its waxing cycle the moon is biggest and most "weighty"

Sometimes liberated

The opposite of the above

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  • $\begingroup$ +1 but no. I like the interpretation of monthly child, but that of liberated is very stretched. $\endgroup$ – h34 May 25 '15 at 20:33
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The Menstrual Cycle

Possibly a star could mean

The cycle could result in the birth of a future-famous celebrity

A monthly child

It happens once a month and involves a key to progeneration

Sometimes weighty

Commonly includes bloating / slight weight gain

Sometimes liberated

Sometimes (but not always) the menstrual cycle is 'liberated' from the woman's reproductive system.

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  • $\begingroup$ +1 for a nice try, but no! The use of star isn't as contrived as that: if it were, tram-driver and tall person and thousands of other terms would work just as well. $\endgroup$ – h34 May 25 '15 at 20:28
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I'm almost there with

Neutron

But I'm having trouble with "monthly child". The other clues are pretty clear:

Possibly a star - neutron star
Sometimes weighty - neutron stars are extremely dense and "heavy"
Sometimes liberated - "free neutrons", which are individual neutrons that are free of the nucleus

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  • $\begingroup$ This is a very neat way to get lines 1,3 and 4 into the same semantic field, but nope...nothing to do with neutrons. $\endgroup$ – h34 May 26 '15 at 0:55
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Is it a:

Week?

Possibly a star,

Star of the week!

A monthly child.

Year - Quarter - Month - Week

Sometimes weighty,

Monday

Sometimes liberated.

Friday!

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  • $\begingroup$ Nice effort but no! $\endgroup$ – h34 May 26 '15 at 0:58
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I'll give it a try, you're second hint gave me the idea of:

Luke Sky-walker - Star Wars

Possibly a star,

A Hollywood star, and for reference to Star Wars as someone who 'stars' in the movie

A monthly child.

Luke starts as a child who grows through the story.

Sometimes weighty,

Luke played some weightly roles in the Star wars saga story (sometimes), but there are many other characters that are important (although I haven't really seen it)

Sometimes liberated.

Luke was fighting against the dark side (sometimes) trying to liberate the right side. (But was initially fooled/tricked by the dark side)

Although I was thinking for more of a:

Star Trek like answer

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  • $\begingroup$ Nice try, but the second hint was meant literally, to try to get people to think of what literal stars they know of in the real world. People by then had already mentioned Libra, Venus, Mars and the Moon; I was trying to get them back on the right track :-) Also your interpretation of line 3-4 doesn't fit well with the first hint (not features but types). But +1 for an imaginative effort! $\endgroup$ – h34 May 27 '15 at 6:49
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Any Holiday

Explanation:

Possibly a Star:

Star of the month - where star is the "focus" (As in star of the show). eg: A holiday that is very famous in a particular month could be the main focus of that month.

A monthly child:

A holiday almost always belongs to a particular month. Also, there are holidays in every month.

Sometimes weighty:

Weighty as in important, or heavy on the mind with sadness/whatnot. Large ways to interpret this since many holidays fulfill both or one of the conditions, for example: Remembrance day, which is sad because it's in remembrance of dead people. Or Christmas, which is a major holiday that's very important to many people.

Sometimes liberated:

Some holidays celebrate freedom. Liberated can also mean free from the social norm, and an example of a list of holidays that celebrates things out of the social norm can be found here.

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  • $\begingroup$ Impressive answer that links a lot together, but no. It would be a bit strange to call a holiday a star, I think. $\endgroup$ – h34 May 26 '15 at 1:07
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My answer is

Mars

Possibly a star,

Mars looks like a wandering star in the sky. I believe it was the first one to be identified as something other than a star, because of the way that it wanders.

A monthly child.

March is named for the god Mars.

Sometimes weighty, Sometimes liberated.

Mars is the god of war. War is naturally a weighty subject (and it certainly weighs on those involved), and wars have been fought for the liberation of people.

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  • $\begingroup$ Nice, but no. "Possibly a star" would be a strange clue for a planet, even if ancient people's notion of a star included planets. This is a hint, which I've added in more explicit form as a further hint to the question. $\endgroup$ – h34 May 26 '15 at 18:35
  • $\begingroup$ @h34 - anyone who was looking at mars in the night sky without knowing it to be mars would probably think it was a star. Hence "possibly a star". $\endgroup$ – Glen O May 27 '15 at 3:13
  • $\begingroup$ Point accepted, but in the above comment I was trying to give a hint. $\endgroup$ – h34 May 27 '15 at 7:44

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