8
$\begingroup$

I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: "Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand on the desert. Near them, over his sand,
Half sunk, a shatter'd visage lies, whose gown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The head that mocked them and the heart that fed:
And over the pedestal these words appear:
'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my words, ye Mighty, and despair!'
Nothing beside remain. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.

Shelley

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ that's "frown", not "gown" $\endgroup$ – WhatRoughBeast May 1 '15 at 17:35
6
$\begingroup$

I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: "Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand [o i]n the desert. Near them, o[ver n] [t]h[is e] sand,
Half sunk, a shatter[e]d visage lies, whose [g fr]own,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The h[ea an]d that mocked them and the heart that fed:
And o[ver n] the pedestal these words appear:
'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my wor[d k]s, ye Mighty, and despair!'
Nothing beside remain[s]. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.

gives i,n,t,e,e,f,r,a,n,n,k,s

which is an anagram of Frankenstein

written, of course, by Shelley's wife, Mary Shelley.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ You're missing an 'e' somewhere, though this definitely looks right to me. :) $\endgroup$ – Bailey M May 1 '15 at 18:04
4
$\begingroup$

Rise to greatness on the shoulders of giants...

Removing all of the letters that exist in your new words but not in the existing words we get the following letters...

o ver is g e ver d

Rearranging this a bit we get...

grover is eved

As everyone knows...

Eved is a poetic term for peved...

This clearly indicates the identity of Ozymandias to be none other than...

Grover the lovable blue muppet.

$\endgroup$
3
$\begingroup$

I'll start trying to solve it, it still doesn't make much sense to me:

It's a known poem by Shelley These following words have been changed: on/(in) over/(on), his/(the), gown/(frown), head/(hand), over/(on), words/(works)

overisgeverd / intefrnnk (overisgdntfrk) << characters differing in words changed
oversgevdntfnnk (oversgdntfk) << characters differing in the differing characters OF the words changed
Rei << Characters common to the characters differing in the words changed, lol

Common letters in words changed are nohownhadowors or n, o, h, w, a, d, s, r
a, d, s, r << unique characters in common letters of words changed. I could make : Rads
I guess it could be how's rand and you'd be inquiring after rand in this puzzle of yours.
Or Owon Shadowhorn the great hunter of Jawas. A honor showdown

or again:

letters of original words: inthefrowadks
letters of new words: onverhisgwad

Lol

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ on the right track :) $\endgroup$ – martin Apr 30 '15 at 18:18
  • $\begingroup$ ...you are missing some BTW ;) $\endgroup$ – martin Apr 30 '15 at 19:50
  • $\begingroup$ I think I was missing an 'n' doesn't reallyu change much though $\endgroup$ – Spacemonkey Apr 30 '15 at 19:53
1
$\begingroup$

At first I didn't get what you could be asking. But now I think you mean:

When compared with the original poem, I highlighted the words which were changed in the post from the original poem:

I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: "Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand on the desert. Near them, over his sand,
Half sunk, a shatter'd visage lies, whose gown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The head that mocked them and the heart that fed:
And over the pedestal these words appear:
'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my words, ye Mighty, and despair!'
Nothing beside remain. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.

Which seems to refer to the Egyptian pharaoh headdress. (Possibly related to Ramesses II)

Source:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ozymandias

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ right idea :) ${} {}{}{}$ $\endgroup$ – martin Apr 30 '15 at 18:17
  • $\begingroup$ Head over words.....head over gown.....head over heels?!? Maybe I'm just getting a-head of myself. $\endgroup$ – Mark N Apr 30 '15 at 18:37
  • $\begingroup$ not much to do with heads, I'm afraid! $\endgroup$ – martin Apr 30 '15 at 18:56
  • $\begingroup$ ... or Egypt, come to that ... $\endgroup$ – martin Apr 30 '15 at 18:57

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.