27
$\begingroup$

below is a set of some sort in alphabetical order. can you figure Out what set it Represents? as Usual, Explain why...

                               >
                          - - - - - - 
                               <


                               >
                         - - - - - - -
                               <


                               >
                           - - - - -
                               <


                               >
                   - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                               <

...oh, and if you think it's right - it's actually wrong ;)

$\endgroup$

1 Answer 1

29
$\begingroup$

I think the set is, in order

CYPRUS
IRELAND
MALTA
UNITED KINGDOM

And these are

The countries of Europe in which you drive on the left hand side of the road.

Clues

The blanks represent the number of letters in each word, clarifying our guess.
The way the clues are laid out looks like a road divided in two.
The title says "check the hidden hint" backwards. If you look at the capital letters in the description they spell out ORUE or EURO backwards.
As per the last line, they're not right (but actually left).

$\endgroup$
4
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Now this is right :) Good job! $\endgroup$ Commented Jun 19 at 14:39
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ And there was me thinking FRANCE, GERMANY, ITALY and UNITEDKINGDOM as in Europe's "Big Four" and wondering how on earth it fitted the rest... $\endgroup$
    – Stiv
    Commented Jun 19 at 14:43
  • $\begingroup$ I thought it was something to do with the footie $\endgroup$
    – PDT
    Commented Jun 19 at 14:45
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ Very nice. Now that I've seen the answer, I'm reminded of a logo proposal I once saw on a design blog. It's for rot13(IVN Onuvn, n pbzcnal gung znantrf gbyy uvtujnlf va Oenfvy). $\endgroup$
    – M Oehm
    Commented Jun 19 at 18:49

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.