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So I have gotten back into playing the Minesweeper Advent Calendars on heptaveegesimal.com, and recently came across the 2023 Minesweeper Advent Calendar. I am currently trying to beat Day 62, which I have gotten very close to beating multiple times, usually getting within 15 to 20 spaces left before I fail.

The general overview is that we have 6 6x6 boards that are acting like they are just one 6x6x6 board, with a mine counted by the 26 "surrounding" tiles.

This is my current game, which I am struggling with:

enter image description here

and I am not sure where to go from here, so my question is

What can I next logically deduce here?

Here's a hint given by the developer if it might help:

8 of the mines are on the same layer as usual, although there are an additional 9 mines at the corresponding position both one layer above and one layer below

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    $\begingroup$ In the topmost plane (the last one), there is a mine, along the edge, 3rd position from below. Reason: the tile right above it(showing 1) has no other neighbour which might contain a mine. $\endgroup$ Commented Feb 20 at 17:08
  • $\begingroup$ Second position from bottom in second plane along the edge is not a mine, second position from bottom along the edge in first plane is a mine. quite a long explanation. (x,y,z) z for plane, there is a 1 at (1,3,1) which means either (1,2,1) or (1,2,2) is a mine. there is a 2 at (1,3,2) which means are 2 mines at (1,2,1),(1,2,2),(1,2,3),(2,2,3). Therefore (1,2,3) or (2,2,3) guaranteed contains a mine. Therefore 1 at (1,3,3) has a mine around it (1,2,3) or (2,2,3). Since there is only 1 mine around it, (1,2,2) is not a mine. And therefore (1,2,1) is a mine. $\endgroup$ Commented Feb 20 at 17:29

2 Answers 2

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Chosen Convention: (x,y,z) z for plane

(1,2,2) is not a mine (1,2,1) is a mine.

Reason:

  • There is a 1 at (1,3,1) which means either (1,2,1) or (1,2,2) is a mine.
  • There is a 2 at (1,3,2) which means are 2 mines at (1,2,1),(1,2,2),(1,2,3),(2,2,3).
  • Therefore (1,2,3) or (2,2,3) guaranteed contains a mine.
  • Therefore 1 at (1,3,3) has a mine around it (1,2,3) or (2,2,3).
  • Since there is only 1 mine around it, (1,2,2) is not a mine.
  • And therefore (1,2,1) is a mine.

(2,2,4) and (2,1,4) Are not Mines

Reason:

  • There is a 2 at (3,2,5) which already has a mine around it: at (4,1,4)
  • Therefore (2,1,4),(2,2,4),(2,1,5),(2,2,5),(2,1,6),(2,2,6) anyone of them contain a mine.
  • There is a 1 at (3,1,6) which means there is a mine at (2,1,5),(2,2,5),(2,1,6),(2,2,6)
  • Since only one of the six coordinates contain a mine. (2,1,4),(2,2,4) are for sure without a mine.

Will Edit if find more blocks

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Here is a start

enter image description here

In the bottom panel a 1 has only one possibility for a bomb.
The red dot is a bomb.

Then the 2-1 on the fourth row of the second from last panel tells all green dots are safe.

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