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I am not from where you're from,
But you've seen my home before.
It's smaller than you're used to,
With weather you can't ignore.

In the morning you see it,
And in the evening it's there,
But if you search late at night,
You won't find it anywhere.

Like you, I love the sunrise-
To feel the warmth on my skin.
How I dread to wait two years
To enjoy it once again.

But please, don't be disheartened
When my home changes its look.
It's just going through a phase,
which I trust you'll overlook.

I'm sure you can acknowledge
its great eccentricity,
And that it's the least tilted
Of any place we can see.

Although it is quite tiny,
It's packed quite tightly, really.
And though it can be real hot,
It also gets quite chilly.

I hope you'll be attracted
by all these wonderful things,
And admire its dance, with soul,
Which is filled with such wide swings.

Disclaimer: Created 100% from my own brain over the past 72 hours. No AI was used. :)

A correct answer will explain all the lines.

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    $\begingroup$ @PDT I take your point but disagree to an extent - I think there will always be room for a nicely crafted riddle. Part of the art of the riddle is in its poetry, imagery, and creative presentation. While an online solving tool might get an answer, only a human reader can truly appreciate the creativity behind it, and there's still joy to be had in that :) $\endgroup$
    – Stiv
    Commented Feb 16 at 14:38
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    $\begingroup$ @PDT For me, It guessed the moon for its second guess. On to another topic: do you enjoy riddles, PDT? Why are you asking an AI? Do you really care about these utterly worthless rep points? Because you do realize that they are utterly worthless, right? The fun is in the journey. And if you must cheat, and ask someone else, where is the fun in that? You are only cheating yourself. But please have the decency to not post this kind of thing directly on people's puzzles. People put time and energy into these things. I was shocked at some of your comments on PrimNumbahs "rainbow"-looking post. $\endgroup$
    – JLee
    Commented Feb 16 at 19:36
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    $\begingroup$ @PDT They were just rude- flat out rude. $\endgroup$
    – JLee
    Commented Feb 16 at 19:37
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    $\begingroup$ @jlee I apologize, I didn’t realize the things that I said could be so hurtful, for the record, I did upvote this riddle and said it was excellent. I apologize for harshly criticizing Prime Numbers puzzle too. $\endgroup$
    – PDT
    Commented Feb 17 at 3:15
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    $\begingroup$ @PDT Thanks, it's all good, PDT. forgiven and forgotten. The whole reason I brought it up was to get it back to good. I look forward to your puzzles and answers in the future. No hard feelings. $\endgroup$
    – JLee
    Commented Feb 17 at 11:05

1 Answer 1

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Is it

Mercury?

To go (more or less) line by line as requested:

I am not where you're from

It's not Earth

Though you've seen my home before

Mercury is observable with the naked eye

It's smaller than you're used to

The smallest planet in the solar system

With weather you can't ignore

Mercury doesn't really have an atmosphere so it's hard to "ignore" solar winds or micrometeorites

In the morning you see it

Mercury can be seen during morning twilight

And in the evening it's there

Mercury can also be seen during evening twilight

But if you search late at night
You won't find it anywhere

Very best case for seeing Mercury is early fall or late winter on the Southern hemisphere where it sets a couple of hours after sunset, but sunset in late winter is still early enough a couple hours out from that probably doesn't count as "late at night". It being closer than Earth to the sun, we only ever see it close to the sun, with the highest "angle" to the sun (from our point of view) being between 18° to 28° (the times at which this happen fall into early fall/late winter on the Southern hemisphere).

...okay, I might have to take some of it in chunks:
Like you, I love the sunrise
To feel the warmth on my skin
How I dread to wait two years
To enjoy it once again

A day on Mercury is two Mercury years

But please, don't be disheartened
When my home changes its look
It's just going through a phase
Which I trust you'll overlook

Mercury has "phases" like the moon

I'm sure you can acknowledge
Its great eccentricity

Mercury has the most eccentric orbit of all planets in the solar system

And that it's the least tilted

Mercury has an axial tilt of almost zero

Of any place we can see

...which is lower than any other planet in the solar system plus the Moon in any case

Although it is quite tiny

Again, smallest planet

It's rather massive, really

...but smallest planet is still big while it's smaller than some moons in the solar system it's also got a higher mass than they do.

And although it can be real hot

Highest surface temperature is 427°C

It also gets quite chilly

lowest surface temperature is -173°C

I hope you'll be attracted
By all these wonderful things
And admire its dance, with soul

Might be a reach, but the god Mercury in Roman mythology guided souls to the underworld. Alternatively, "soul" is a (near) homophone for "Sol", as in the Sun, since that's what it orbits.

Which is filled with such wide swings

Again, Mercury's orbit, maybe the eccentricity (it "swings" pretty far), the periods where it looks like it's moving in retrograde from Earth,...

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    $\begingroup$ All right, gave it another shot! Hope I haven't made a complete hash of explaining the visibility.... $\endgroup$ Commented Feb 17 at 12:55
  • $\begingroup$ I was on the fence about whether to bring up the density, I kept thinking what if it‘s a trap because you’d specified mass. Extremely fair about the visibility though, my spatial reasoning skills are best described as hot garbage :P $\endgroup$ Commented Feb 17 at 14:26
  • $\begingroup$ good point about density. i see why you hesitated to bring that up. Just update that visibility part and i will checkmark this one. Great job. $\endgroup$
    – JLee
    Commented Feb 17 at 14:32
  • $\begingroup$ I went ahead and changed that line that mentioned "massive", since, to your point, it is not the same as density. You can edit that into your answer if you want, or leave it as it is. either way. $\endgroup$
    – JLee
    Commented Feb 17 at 15:07

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