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[companion question here]

I was given an 11x11x11 Rubik's cube as a gift. It came with a guide book that I have been following to solve the cube.

After solving four of the 9x9 sub-centers of the cube, and after solving the 5x5 sub-centers of the remaining two faces, the guidebook prompts to solve the 7x7 sub-centers. There is an error in the guide book notation, where it has duplicate algorithms (circled in red) to "swap" two different pairs of pieces:

Picture showing another pair of duplicate algorithms

I have not tested either of these duplicate algorithms yet, but I am guessing that the center-right circled algorithm is correct, and need a new algorithm for the bottom left one in the image.

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I finally got to this today. I am now used to the intuitive pattern, and I have corrected the mistakes in the algorithms:

Corrections

There is a general intuitive pattern here, and I will copy and paste Reddit user XenosHg 's explanation to give credit:

the center commutator works intuitively like this:

  1. put these 2 pieces in the same column
  2. slice the piece into its correct place
  3. rotate that side by 90 degrees so the piece is in a different column. (so you can't rotate upper-right diagonal piece into lower-right diagonal piece, the column must be different)
  4. slice this new column in the same direction.
  5. turn back. undo first slice, turn, undo second slice, turn back.

So if you slice from up to front, then you rotate front. If you slice from front to up, then you rotate up. Easy.

It doesn't actually swap 2 pieces, 2 pieces is impossible, but it swaps 3 pieces, and on a mostly solved cube, you will usually hit 2 same-color squares out of 3.

2R U' 2L' U 2R' U' 2L U

view at CubeDB.net

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