12
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Weird given they're both united...

Police! This man stole my _____! (5) [4]
1989 Metal album by Alice Cooper (5) [5]
Something Rome did in 476 (4) [1]
Gnarly, rad, tubular even (4) [3]
Unit of length equal to about 0.914 m (4) [5]
Potato-based "French" side dish (5) [1]
Can be cotton, rock or eye (5) [5]

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1 Answer 1

13
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The divided brothers are ...

... the United Kingdom and the United States of America. They are both "united", but not with each other.

First, ...

... solve the clues. The number in round brackets is the number of letters in each answer.

Police! This man stole my _____! PURSE
1989 Metal album by Alice Cooper TRASH
Something Rome did in 476 FALL
Gnarly, rad, tubular even COOL
Unit of length equal to about 0.914 m YARD
Potato-based "French" side dish FRIES
Can be cotton, rock or eye CANDY

Next, ...

... we want to extract a single word from these answers. The tag tells us so. We could use the number in square brackets as poition of a letter, but unfortunately, the fifth clue's position exceeds its length.

Note how each of the words is American, where another word would be used in Britain. (That doesn't necessarily apply to all meanings of a word and not always to the exact meaning used in the clue, as in fall and yard.)

We must find the British equivalent for each of the answers and then extract the letter at the position given in square brackets:

purse – HAN[D]BAG
trash – RUBB[I]SH
fall – [A]UTUMN
cool – SP[L]ENDID
yard – GARD[E]N
fries – [C]HIPS
candy – SWEE[T]S

So the final answer is, appropriately, DIALECT.

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3
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ Nice work +1, but cough as a Brit, I think your fifth one should be rot13(tneqra)... $\endgroup$
    – Stiv
    Sep 8, 2022 at 17:16
  • $\begingroup$ Well, you are obviously the authority here, @Stiv. (I often don't know the exact meaning of words, especially for everyday things, and I found that one with the help of a decitionary.) $\endgroup$
    – M Oehm
    Sep 8, 2022 at 17:35
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Good job! Also despite finding the "wrong" word for the 4th one, you still managed. My original idea used fvpx (although yours works quite well too) $\endgroup$
    – Auribouros
    Sep 9, 2022 at 7:38

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