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In a certain battlefield, there are two sets of fraternal twins and two sets of fraternal triplets.


In the first line of defence, the first set of fraternal twins are standing on the right facing east.


In the second line of defence, the first set of fraternal triplets are standing in the middle while the second set of fraternal triplets are standing on the right. Both sets of fraternal triplets are facing east.


In the third line of defence, the second set of fraternal twins are standing on the right facing west.


Where is this battlefield?

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  • $\begingroup$ Given the accepted answer, I wonder if you could have worked in one more set, facing north? They have crossed a line, so I suppose it's fair for them to be left out. $\endgroup$ Aug 29, 2022 at 1:57
  • $\begingroup$ @DanielMathias Interesting suggestion. It didn't occur to me to be honest. All I could see was twins and triplets facing east or west. And not all 'battlefields' use northward facing sets. The directions will be titled. $\endgroup$ Aug 29, 2022 at 2:41

3 Answers 3

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This 'battlefield' is:

a QWERTY keyboard!

And the fraternal 'twins' and 'triplets' are:

groups of 2 or 3 consecutive letters of the English alphabet which also appear next to each other on the keyboard.

In the first line of defence, the first set of fraternal twins are standing on the right facing east.

In the top row of letters on a QWERTY keyboard, 'O' and 'P' sit adjacent to each other on the right, and in their usual alphabetical order (i.e. left to right, facing east).

O and P on top row of QWERTY keyboard

In the second line of defence, the first set of fraternal triplets are standing in the middle while the second set of fraternal triplets are standing on the right. Both sets of fraternal triplets are facing east.

In the second row of letters on a QWERTY keyboard, 'F', 'G' and 'H' sit adjacent to each other in the middle, and in their usual alphabetical order (i.e. left to right, facing east). Meanwhile, 'J', 'K' and 'L' do similarly, but on the right.

FGH and JKL on middle row of QWERTY keyboard

In the third line of defence, the second set of fraternal twins are standing on the right facing west.

In the third row of letters on a QWERTY keyboard, 'M' and 'N' sit adjacent to each other on the right. However, this time they appear in reverse alphabetical order (i.e. right to left, facing west).

N and M on bottom row of QWERTY keyboard

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  • $\begingroup$ Looks good to me! $\endgroup$
    – Florian F
    Aug 28, 2022 at 22:02
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It should be...

A table football table or table soccer table.
Or a baby-foot as it is called in French.

Not sure, though, about both triplets facing east.

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    $\begingroup$ I thought about this but the second twins are facing the other way so I don't think this could be right. $\endgroup$
    – hexomino
    Aug 27, 2022 at 23:25
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    $\begingroup$ But they're identical, not fraternal, in foosball. $\endgroup$
    – msh210
    Aug 28, 2022 at 5:42
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Maybe this isn’t the answer, but nevertheless it does give us one set of twins and two sets of triplets.

During the reign of King Tullus Hostilus, Roma (city of Twins: Romulus and Remus) and Alba Longa both had a set of triplets serving in their armies.

The ruler of Alba Longa—King Mettius Futetius—suggested that the triplets duel and the winning side would be ruler of both cities. So the six triplets faced each other in mortal combat.

“The six champions now made ready for battle. As they stepped forward into the lists between the two armies their hearts were high, and ringing in their ears were the voice of friends, bidding them remember that their parents, their country, and their country's gods, their fellow soldiers and all they loved at home would be watching their prowess and all eyes were on their swords.”(Livy, The Early History of Rome, p. 59.

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    $\begingroup$ Interesting anecdote! However the answer is very simple. You will see and use that 'battlefield' everyday! $\endgroup$ Aug 28, 2022 at 12:44

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