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I can be a question that ends in a question

I can be a question that ends in an answer

I can be an answer that ends in a question

I can be an answer that ends in an answer

Cut off my end, I still stay the same

Cut off my front, I still stay the same

What 4 letter word am I? The title is also a part of the puzzle.

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1 Answer 1

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I think the answer could be:

OKAY

I can be a question that ends in a question
I can be a question that ends in an answer
I can be an answer that ends in a question
I can be an answer that ends in an answer

The word 'OKAY' can be used as both a question ('Okay?' as in 'Are you alright?' or 'Is that understood?') and an answer ('Okay' as in 'I'm fine' or 'Got it').

Meanwhile - wordplay time - the word ends in 'Y', which sounds like 'Why?' (a question) and 'AY', which sounds like it could be the first option in a multiple-choice list of answers (or the common abbreviation, 'A' for Answer, as in 'Q&A').

Cut off my end, I still stay the same
Cut off my front, I still stay the same

Remove 'AY' from the end and you have OK, an alternative spelling.

Remove 'O' from the front and you have 'KAY, which is a common slang way to shorten the word.

As for the title:

The word OKAY/OK is generally considered to be American in origin, first appearing in an 1839 article in the Boston Morning Post. Many people believe it to have been invented by president Martin Van Buren as part of his presidential campaign slogan, 'Vote for OK' (OK here standing for 'Old Kinderhook', his nickname) but these days it seems more common to believe that he merely popularised its use...

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