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Make these two "equivalent" equations true by simply moving (changing the position of) exactly three lines (per equation). The equations are two different representations of the same (what I mean by this is up to you to figure out). No inequalities(≠, >, < or ≤) are allowed. Also, no rotation of the image needed.


enter image description here

enter image description here


EDIT: To minimize potential answers, I'm going to tell you that one equation contains letters only. Remember what I said earlier - "The equations are two different representations of the same (what I mean by this is up to you to figure out)". Also, the title will hopefully make sense once you figure out the correct answer.

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3 Answers 3

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We can move 3 matchsticks per statement to obtain the following two statements,

first statement: Π = PI, second statement: Π = 3.14

where one of the matchsticks in the second statement has been stood up on its end to create a dot. The first statement contains only letters, and the statements are different representations of

the Greek letter π, hence the title: "This is Greek to me!"

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  • $\begingroup$ I thought the title was referencing rot13(rnfl nf cvr), but yours is better $\endgroup$ Feb 21, 2022 at 1:29
  • $\begingroup$ This is the intended answer, well done! $\endgroup$ Feb 21, 2022 at 4:58
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    $\begingroup$ As a pedantic mathematician, I will note that the second equation is not true. :/ $\endgroup$ Feb 21, 2022 at 15:45
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    $\begingroup$ @XanderHenderson Agreed, this is why I refrained from calling it such in my answer. \: $\endgroup$
    – noedne
    Feb 21, 2022 at 16:02
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I think, ${}{}{}{}{}{}{}{}{}{}{}{}$

my-solution-to-matchstick-puzzle

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    $\begingroup$ It's a good answer, but not the intended one $\endgroup$ Feb 20, 2022 at 15:14
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    $\begingroup$ This was the answer I came up with, and has the advantage (over the accepted answer) of being mathematically correct. :D $\endgroup$ Feb 21, 2022 at 15:46
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The ones in the second aren't identical, but still:

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ Nice attempt, but I mean't that the two equations are equivalent to each other. I'll edit to clarify this. $\endgroup$ Feb 20, 2022 at 13:13
  • $\begingroup$ @Prim3numbah: If one doesn't mind uneven horizontal spacing, I think "0=0" and "0=00" could be formed via three moves in each case. $\endgroup$
    – supercat
    Feb 21, 2022 at 20:39

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