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I've been struggling with the first step of the beginner Rubik's cube solving algorithm with one simple problem. I am able to get the top face as all white, with blue and orange center pieces adjacent to each other. However, in the guide, in order from top, left side, and right side, the colors are white, orange, blue.

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However, in my cube, I have, in same order, white, blue, orange.

enter image description here

As someone even slightly more experienced than me can confirm, this is still a valid cube and I haven't somehow swapped its edges. I have tried to "swap" these centers in relation to each other for a while, and this doesn't seem to be possible. Even most sources say that centers cannot change in relation to each other:

enter image description here

There are algorithms for "swapping centers", but these involve "swapping" the top as well and cannot simply interchange the order of these. However, even in the very guide I'm following, one of the very steps involves a cube that has its center "swapped", as follows:

enter image description here

(as, if the cube were flipped, the order here would be white, blue, orange). Is there something really obvious I'm missing?

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One of my old and tattered cubes doesn't even have a white-orange-blue corner – white is opposite blue:

This is also not the scheme on official Rubik's cubes.

Never fix your mind to make a white cross, or any specific colour cross. Speedsolvers pay little attention to the explicit colours when solving, only the patterns formed by stickers of the same colour and the orientations and permutations of whole pieces per se. Be colour-agnostic, in short.

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  • $\begingroup$ this does kinda make sense, but I suppose I was most confused why on the original guide, with their shown illustration, they had a timeline of each step and somehow showed that they could go from the white, blue, orange cube to the yellow, blue, orange cube in the same one $\endgroup$
    – Daneolog
    Jan 26 at 1:39
  • $\begingroup$ @Daneolog The explanation's the same: the colours themselves don't matter. $\endgroup$ Jan 26 at 3:45

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