6
$\begingroup$

The following is a relatively basic cipher I have constructed. I still hope it's entertaining.


_ _ _ _ _ _ _
A _ A A A
A A _
A A
A D
B
B _
A A
B H

The answer is the 9-letter name of a famous man who helped created this puzzle.

Small hint:

Note the tag.

Medium hint:

Look at the name of puzzle, and remember that this involves math.

$\endgroup$
3
  • $\begingroup$ I can change it then. I'm quite new to this exchange. Are the horizontal spaces useful? $\endgroup$
    – PiGuy314
    Oct 5 at 19:34
  • $\begingroup$ You mean the spaces between the underscores? I believe they are since the rest of the puzzle includes spaces between the letters. Also, if you ever want feedback before posting a puzzle, you can always join us in chat, or post your puzzle in the sandbox. $\endgroup$ Oct 5 at 20:10
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you. I was unaware of these things. $\endgroup$
    – PiGuy314
    Oct 5 at 22:37
3
$\begingroup$

Initial thoughts:

Nine lines in the cipher, and nine letters to find, so likely one letter per line, so we are looking for a way to turn a row of multiple symbols into a single letter.
The tag combined with the low number of distinct symbols, and the latest letter being 'H' means we could be looking at a simple A=1, B=2 etc translation, with '_' representing 0.

Which gives us:

0000000
10111
110
11
14
2
20
11
28

But that doesn't obviously translate back to letters.

More thoughts:

The rapidly reducing line lengths, and nothing above N-1 in row N makes it look like we could have numbers in different bases. So try interpreting row N in base N.

Which gives us:

 0000000 (1) =  7 = G
   10111 (2) = 23 = W
     110 (3) = 12 = L
      11 (4) =  5 = E
      14 (5) =  9 = I
       2 (6) =  2 = B
      20 (7) = 14 = N
      11 (8) =  9 = I
      28 (9) = 26 = Z 

So the famous man we are looking for is:

Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz

As for the hints:

Now that I've solved it, I realise in that the second hint pointing to this "basic" cipher, and was providing a big signpost to the different bases, which I completely failed to spot...

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ Congratulations on solving the cipher! : ) Leibniz is considered to be the inventor of the binary system as well as the first to show its use in a computing machine. $\endgroup$
    – PiGuy314
    Oct 8 at 11:30

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.