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I arrive at the location I've agreed with my European friend, who is teaching me their native language. Today we're learning some history of their country.

But to aid in my learning, I've been banned from speaking in English (my native language).

Woe is me however, as I've forgotten how to ask anything like "How do I say...." in the language I'm learning.

It's gotten so bad, and my friend so frustrated, that I'm not even allowed to point.

However they've offered me a deal: if I can name the type of building at this location, my friend will let me speak English for a while, but I can't get it wrong or I lose my only chance!

In my desperation, I realise I can draw a symbol to ask my friend what I think the building is called in their native language, without speaking so as not to lose my chance of speaking English again.

I draw this symbol:

connected lines divided into four quadrants. Working clockwise: in the first quadrant one vertical line, in the second two vertical lines one shorter than the other. In the third quadrant two vertical lines of the same length, in the fourth one vertical line joined part way along a horizontal line

When my friend sees the drawing, they chuckle and nod that I am correct.

What language am I learning?

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This picture represents:

The internet meme: "Is this Loss?"

Meaning

You're looking for a building type that is either written as 'loss' in English, or is a homophone of 'loss' in another language.

After some research and Google Translate guesswork:

'Loss' means 'castle' in Estonian. You are asking about a castle in Estonia

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  • $\begingroup$ That answer is correct! $\endgroup$
    – Pureferret
    Sep 28 at 12:36

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