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Paragrams (the basis of puzzles) are word relations formed by changing a single letter to change the meaning of a word. For example, you can make letter a little better, fifty more nifty, and lively very lovely. This puzzle is based on a 6-letter word for which all but one letter can be substituted to form another word. The format is as follows:

  • Each row has the letter and the corresponding meaning of a word
  • If the letter can be substituted in the original word, the meaning will be from the word formed after substitution
  • If the letter can't be substituted in the original word, the meaning will be from the original word
Letter Meaning
1 A confused mess
2 Ornamental band
3 Plunder
4 Pack
5 Rubber band
6 Goof

Note: please provide all 6 words in your solution!

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These might be a decent fit:

 Jungle - A confused mess
 Bangle - Ornamental band
 Burgle - Plunder
 Bundle - Pack
 Bungee - Rubber band
 Bungle - Goof (the original word)

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  • $\begingroup$ That would be it! Fast solve - do you think it was too easy & are there ways to make it better? $\endgroup$
    – Avi
    Sep 3 '21 at 18:31
  • $\begingroup$ In hindsight, the intrinsic structure of the puzzle makes it so that once you've figured out "Ornamental band (6)" you know the whole word except for one letter; and actually there's only one other letter that position 2 could have been and still make a word. You could make it harder by giving harder clues (e.g. "Egyptian singer? (6)") or by changing the puzzle design (e.g. withholding the numbers 1-6, or replacing a letter and anagramming in each position: "Laundry agent (6)"). $\endgroup$ Sep 4 '21 at 15:59
  • $\begingroup$ @Quuxplusone making puzzles harder is easy, knowing when to stop is the difficult part. I think OP nailed the difficulty level in this one: there are six doors into the solution, and all of them have locks on. Finding the weakest lock is only easy in hindsight. $\endgroup$
    – Bass
    Sep 5 '21 at 6:26

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