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The chameleon and sphinx are examples of this. So are the birds and the bee's larder, if you are generous

A clue: The sphinx has the fewest scales, and the bee's larder has the most

Another clue: The chameleon and bird aren't quite the same as the sphinx and bee's larder

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  • $\begingroup$ For clarification, do you mean the larder of the birds and the bees? $\endgroup$
    – hexomino
    Jun 26 at 22:18
  • $\begingroup$ @hexomino No, the larder refers just to the bee's larder $\endgroup$ Jun 27 at 7:28
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    $\begingroup$ I would recommend that instead of just writing "That isn't correct" under each incorrect answer, you provide a steer - let people know if they are at all partially correct or thinking along the right lines, or even give a clue to help narrow down to the true answer. Otherwise this just becomes a guessing game that will start to accumulate downvotes as a result... Thanks! $\endgroup$
    – Stiv
    Jun 30 at 10:20
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Chameleon, sphinx, nest, and hive are all names of PYTHON (the programming language) tools and collaboration software. But that doesn't use wordplay so I am hoping this is wrong.

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  • $\begingroup$ That isn't correct $\endgroup$ Jun 24 at 7:55
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They are all ...

... moths.

In particular:

Chameleon moths;
Sphingidae, the sphinx or hawk moths;
Noctuidae, the owlet moths;
Korscheltellus lupulina, the common swift;
Galleria mellonella, the honeycomb moth.

Doubts about the answer:

There doesn't really seem to be a moth officially called "chameleon moth"; at best that is a vernacular name for different generafor moths or moth caterpillars that can adapt to their surroundings. (Web searches for "chameleon moth" bring up forum discussions about whether moths or caterpillars are suitable food for chameleons.)

With the exception of the common swift, all species above are called something moths, so you can't really say "hoenycomb is an example of a moth". And I'm not sure why we have to be generous.

But the hint provides some reassurance: Moths (and butterflies) have scales on their wings.

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  • $\begingroup$ rot13(Vg'f cbffvoyr gung gur nafjre vf whfg gung gurl nyy unir fpnyrf, fb gur "oveqf naq gur orrf' yneqre" znl unir gb trg n ovg trarebhf.) $\endgroup$ Jun 30 at 12:51
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    $\begingroup$ That isn't correct, but it is a group of animals (sort of) $\endgroup$ Jun 30 at 14:09
  • $\begingroup$ Something more ichthyic perhaps? $\endgroup$
    – M Oehm
    Jul 1 at 12:44
  • $\begingroup$ @MOehm Not fish, but you're closer $\endgroup$ Jul 1 at 21:25
  • $\begingroup$ Some contradictory clues, possibly spiders. $\endgroup$
    – z100
    Jul 3 at 21:12
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Is the answer:

Camouflage?

Because:

Chameleons can camouflage with their surroundings, and a sphinx is the same color as the sand around it. A bird can blend in with the flowers around it, and a bee can do the same in its larder.

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  • $\begingroup$ That isn't correct $\endgroup$ Jun 28 at 5:05
  • $\begingroup$ Aww dang ;-; :( $\endgroup$ Jun 28 at 23:02
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Possibility that:

They are numbers.

CHAMELEON (one anagrammed), SPHINX (six) Bird as in, PIGEON (one anagrammed) Bee's larder as in, HONEY (one)

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  • $\begingroup$ That isn't correct $\endgroup$ Jun 30 at 8:01
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Partial answer:

Chameleon, Sphinx, The Byrds and The Honeycombs are the names of rock bands.

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  • $\begingroup$ These guys are probably better known than the one you state here... Maybe add some Wikipedia links to add more strength to your answer? $\endgroup$
    – Stiv
    Jun 30 at 10:11
  • $\begingroup$ That isn't correct $\endgroup$ Jun 30 at 10:13
  • $\begingroup$ @Stiv, you're right, but the principle of the solution is the same. Incorrect anyway. $\endgroup$
    – z100
    Jun 30 at 10:53
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    $\begingroup$ @IchthysKing Stop saying something like "That isn't correct" and start actually helping people get to the correct solution. $\endgroup$ Jun 30 at 12:48
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The answer is:

Reptile

Explanation:

Chameleons are obvious. Birds evolved from reptiles, and so are considered reptiles cladistically. The sphinx is a shape known as a rep-tile, which is a shape that can be split into smaller-scale versions of itself. A hexagon, the rough shape of a honeycomb cell, is also a rep-tile, but it requires an infinite number of different scales for the split version

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  • $\begingroup$ I wonder if the 'wordplay' tag might have helped people in the right direction with their answers $\endgroup$
    – Elpharya
    Jul 6 at 14:47

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