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enter image description here

I need help identifying this mechanical puzzle that consists of 6 pieces (see image) which I have to fit together into a sort of concave polyhedron.

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    $\begingroup$ Why does this have a "needs attribution" close vote? The asker might not know where the puzzle is from; indeed the question is asking us to identify the puzzle. We're not being asked to solve, just identify. This kind of question (identify puzzle off pictures) is acceptable here - see other mechanical puzzle identification requests. $\endgroup$
    – bobble
    Jun 9 '21 at 22:24
  • $\begingroup$ I have no other information then provided in the picture, I just found the 6 pieces by themselves while cleaning out my room (no box, and none of the pieces have any logos or identifying marks). The 6 pieces are not identical, there are the 4 "main" ones at the top, then the other 2 have slight variations that make them different (as well as the fact that 3 are "left-facing" and 3 are "right-facing". I can try to provide a higher quality image (with better lighting) if that would help. $\endgroup$ Jun 9 '21 at 23:35
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, better lighting may help. Please also consider doing a close-up (or close-ups, of different angles if necessary) of each of the three different piece shapes. $\endgroup$
    – bobble
    Jun 9 '21 at 23:36
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This puzzle was designed by Stewart Coffin, and he called it the Star of David puzzle. It is a variation on the classic diagonal burr puzzle. The aim is to put the pieces together into a symmetric shape, and there are three distinct symmetric shapes you can make that have 3-fold rotational symmetry. One of these shapes looks like a 6-pointed star from one direction.

It has not been mass-produced, but only made in relatively small numbers by hand by puzzle craftspeople.

Here are some pictures taken from John Rausch's site:

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Nowadays you can 3D-print puzzles like this.

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  • $\begingroup$ Wow! This is really incredible, that you were able to identify it if it's so rarely produced- how were you able to find it? $\endgroup$ Jun 10 '21 at 8:25
  • $\begingroup$ @IsaacMammel I thought it had to be one of Stewart Coffin's designs. I bought a copy of his book The Puzzling World of Polyhedral Dissections thirty years ago, and that book inspired hundreds of puzzle makers to design and produce many new assembly puzzles since then. I found the name of the puzzle eventually by doing an image search for some combination of "diagonal burr" and Coffin. $\endgroup$ Jun 10 '21 at 8:55

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