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Two men had a certain number of camels, and sold those camels. The price of each camel was equal to the total number of camels they owned initially. They then bought a certain number of goats for that money, and for the remaining money they bought a dog.

What will be the total price of animals for each person is equal?
What will be the price of the dog if, when both men share the animals, the total price of animals for each person is equal?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Len, leoll2, Antti Haapala, A E, kaine Mar 23 '15 at 20:34

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ The problem isn't clear, by "each rate" you mean the price of each camel? So, if a man had 20 camels, each camel costs 20? "For that money"...which money? The one they got selling the camels? Please edit the problem :) The final question is also missing a "if" statement or something similar, because it doesn't make sense; who's equal? $\endgroup$ – leoll2 Mar 23 '15 at 18:01
  • $\begingroup$ This seems like you can pick any old number and it works out. For example, the men had 10 camels and sold them for $100 total. Then they bought 10 goats for $1 apiece. Then they used their remaining $90 to buy a dog. $\endgroup$ – Kevin Mar 23 '15 at 18:24
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    $\begingroup$ There are several things missing: 1. There must be some constraint on the price of a goat (do all goats cost the same? is there some relation to the price of the camels?) --- 2. There must be some constraint on the price of the dog (is this price smaller than that of a goat?) --- 3. The question in the end is incomprehensible. $\endgroup$ – Gamow Mar 23 '15 at 18:24
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Let's say a dog is not free, but is cheaper than a goat, which is cheaper than a camel, and all prices are integers. And further, let's say that the men initially each had the same number of camels and each ended up with some larger number of goats (again the same amount each). Then we have a number of solutions...

$$\begin{array}{c|c|c} \text{Camels each} & \text{Camel price} & \text{Total} & \text{Goat price} & \text{Goats each} & \text {Dog price} \\ \hline 1 & 2 & 4 & \text{No solution} \\ \hline 2 & 4 & 16 & \text{No solution} \\ \hline 3 & 6 & 36 & \text{No solution} \\ \hline 4 & 8 & 64 & 6 & 5 & 4 \\ & & & 5 & 6 & 4 \\ \hline 5 & 10 & 100 & 8 & 6 & 4 \\ & & & 7 & 7 & 2 \\ & & & 6 & 8 & 4 \\ \hline 6 & 12 & 144 & 10 & 7 & 4 \\ & & & 7 & 10 & 4 \\ & & & 5 & 14 & 4 \\ \hline 7 & 14 & 196 & 12 & 8 & 4 \\ & & & 8 & 12 & 4 \\ & & & 6 & 16 & 4 \\ \end{array}$$

etc. The interesting solution among these is the case when 5 camels each are sold and 7 goats each are bought, and the dog only costs 2.

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