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Another riddle from ~ Words That Get Stuck In MacGyver88's Head ~(:P)

My prefix - ( i ) are this/these.

My infix - The sixth lost its sixth.

My suffix - Even though short, eating the first still leaves enough.

My whole - A nice sight to see on a winter day's drive.

What am I?

Hint 1

( i ) can be considered a rough representation of a logo or symbol

Hint 2

My whole is probably not a word you hear outside of a certain college class or related profession. (It's been stuck in my head for 20 years)

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  • $\begingroup$ I just upvoted your question, congrats on reaching more than 5000 rep! :D $\endgroup$ Feb 10 at 12:50
  • $\begingroup$ I feel special :p $\endgroup$ Feb 10 at 12:51
  • $\begingroup$ @Anonymus25-ReinstateMonica, Thank you. I appreciate your generosity. I did that once as well for someone's milestone. It felt pretty good. I hoped it helped them have a good Christmas. $\endgroup$
    – MacGyver88
    Feb 10 at 13:25
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I think the answer is

Supersaturation

My prefix - ( i ) are this/these.

This is the symbol for The Incredibles who are SUPER(S)

My infix - The sixth lost its sixth.

The sixth planet from the Sun is SATURN, without its sixth letter is SATUR

My suffix - Even though short, eating the first still leaves enough.

I think this is RATION because eating the first ration still leaves enough food, even though it is in short supply.

OP clarification: SATUR ends in R, RATION starts with R, eating the R is fine because R is already present in SATUR, so it involves the overlap.

My whole - A nice sight to see on a winter day's drive.

I think the idea here is that supersaturation equates to more snow on the ground since it cannot be absorbed into it.

OP clarification: Supersaturation of the salt leaves salt crystals visible on the road, meaning the salt is left over and the roads should be dry.

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  • $\begingroup$ This is correct. My intentions rot13(fnghe raqf va e, engvba fgnegf jvgu e, rngvat gur e vf svar orpnhfr e vf nyernql cerfrag va fnghe, fb vg vaibyirf gur bireync.) $\endgroup$
    – MacGyver88
    Feb 11 at 16:24
  • $\begingroup$ rot13(fhcrefnghengvba bs gur fnyg yrnirf fnyg pelfgnyf ivfvoyr ba gur ebnq, zrnavat gur fnyg vf yrsg bire naq gur ebnqf fubhyq or qel.) $\endgroup$
    – MacGyver88
    Feb 11 at 16:24
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @MacGyver88 Ah, okay, thanks for the clarification, will edit in. $\endgroup$
    – hexomino
    Feb 11 at 16:25
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    $\begingroup$ @MacGyver88 Yeah, that's the bit that I got stuck with. I had figured out the rest but couldn't think what the prefix could be (I think the hint about it being a symbol/logo really helped). $\endgroup$
    – hexomino
    Feb 11 at 16:37
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    $\begingroup$ I'm just glad I could get the word unstuck and sent to others that care. My wife gets tired of hearing me talk like a scientist all the time. $\endgroup$
    – MacGyver88
    Feb 11 at 16:42
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Is it

SNOWFLAKE?

Because

The prefix: Self explanatory, because SNOW and SNOWFLAKE are technically the same thing

The infix: FLAK, taken away the sixth letter of the word SNOWFLAKE gives FAK, which explains the sixes, as the devils number. (If you still don't get it, it's the swearing F word. I'm not gonna say it, just to be safe from the Stack Exchange rules.)

The suffix: The letter E is most definitely short, but cutting off the first part of the letter gives a 3 line pattern, in which the number 3 symbolises (questionably?) life and living forever, which is most definitely enough.

The whole: SNOWFLAKEs are most definitely beautiful to see on a winter's day drive.

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  • $\begingroup$ Sorry. Not the intended answer. Good try though. $\endgroup$
    – MacGyver88
    Feb 10 at 12:02
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is it

DROPLET

My prefix - ( i ) are this/these.

drop are droplets

My suffix - Even though short, eating the first still leaves enough.

-let basically means small or short

My whole - A nice sight to see on a winter day's drive.

can be found on car windows in winter.

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  • $\begingroup$ Sorry. Not the intended answer. Plus, your infix is missing. $\endgroup$
    – MacGyver88
    Feb 11 at 15:42

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