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Is asking your one question while doing an action an answer to the two doors, two guards puzzle? Example: You ask your one question by moving towards any door. Only the true guard will continue to stop you no matter what you do. The fake guard would be powerless to act, as they could only pretend not participate.

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    $\begingroup$ Could you please edit to be more specific about the problem and your strategy? Which two doors, two guards puzzle are you talking about? (There are several). What is meant by "asking your one with a action"? As of right now I can't understand what you are proposing, or why. $\endgroup$
    – bobble
    Jan 28 at 22:27
  • $\begingroup$ I see what you mean I went all backwards about it. Dyslexia strikes again. I don't know if the version matters. The math is 2 Doors one guard. Isn't that what the word problem / riddle is saying. $\endgroup$
    – DoNTMiNDMe
    Jan 28 at 22:58
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    $\begingroup$ The version of the puzzle matters because each has different rules. Without knowing which puzzle you are trying to solve, we can't understand if your proposed strategy would work. (For that matter, I can't understand your proposed strategy either. Please edit for clarity.) $\endgroup$
    – bobble
    Jan 28 at 23:00
  • $\begingroup$ I understand I can check it by applying it to each and every one if it's the right answer it should work for all of them thank you for your comments $\endgroup$
    – DoNTMiNDMe
    Jan 28 at 23:05
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    $\begingroup$ If these comments are important to your question edit them in. Comments are not for extended discussion. (Plus I can't understand your comment discussion anyhow). I won't respond any more. $\endgroup$
    – bobble
    Jan 28 at 23:53
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Let me check that I'm understanding the question correctly, because its phrasing isn't entirely clear.

You're asking about questions that say things like: "You're trapped in a room. There are two doors. One leads to safety, one to a slippery slide down to a vat of flaming acid full of flaming-acid-resistant piranhas. There's a guard posted at each door. One guard always tells the truth except on Thursdays. The other guard always lies, except when the question is about days of the week. You are allowed to ask one guard one question, no more than five words long. Then they will let you pick a door and leave. What question do you ask?".

And you want to know: Is it a good solution to such a question if I bypass all the logical shenanigans and instead do something that will predictably make the guards respond in a way that lets me tell which is the correct door?

(It's not obvious to me whether you have a specific question of this type in mind, or whether you're proposing a general strategy for answer lots of such questions. The answer below applies either way.)


If that's the question, then the answer is: No, it is not a good solution, just as if someone shows you a chess puzzle -- white to play and mate in three moves -- it is no good saying "I would just shoot my opponent dead".

The point of these puzzles is to figure out a logical solution. If you don't want to do that, that's fine -- different people enjoy different things -- but the sort of cheaty answer you describe misses the whole point of this kind of question.

There are "lateral thinking" puzzles where the whole point actually is to spot some obvious and reasonable assumption that you don't actually have to make. Some of them are good puzzles, some not so good. (They can devolve into non-puzzles where what you're really trying to do is guess what silly "solution" the creator had in mind. Or they can just have too many lateral-thinking solutions.) But if you're asked a puzzle of this sort, then unless there's something in how it's asked that suggests you're meant to be breaking the obvious rules, the idea is to work out the logical tangle involved, and it's unlikely that a cheaty answer will bring you either the approval of whoever asked the question or any intellectual satisfaction of your own.

(Also, I would think that cheaty answers to this kind of question would usually rely on assumptions at least as dubious as the ones they're "cleverly" breaking. You've got a puzzle with one real guard and one fake guard, and your idea is to try a door and see which guard tries to stop you? Maybe the fake guard really cares about not having his fake-ness exposed. Maybe the real guard is a bit slow on the uptake. Maybe they both noticed that you picked the acid-piranha-slide door and are happy to let you kill yourself. Etc.)

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  • $\begingroup$ My name is don't mind me I'm nothing but a door an oxymoron bait 100000 K gold really and getting past your reputation requirements other Child's Play $\endgroup$
    – DoNTMiNDMe
    Jan 30 at 2:41

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