5
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This is more difficult instance of a puzzle posted here.

Rules similar to Sudoku applies:

  • In each disk, the numbers 1,2,...7 should appear exactly once.

  • No line may contain duplicate digits (note that there are lines in 3 directions).

Solution is unique, and can be found by using classical sudoku-strategies.

sjudoku 2

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8
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ This one also looks to be symmetric - are there any asymmetric solutions, I wonder? $\endgroup$
    – Deusovi
    Nov 14 '20 at 22:39
  • $\begingroup$ What does asymmetric solutions mean in this context? I chose positions of hints in a symmetric manner, as this is common for sudokus. But note that the values are not symmetric $\endgroup$ Nov 14 '20 at 22:45
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    $\begingroup$ I mean that it appears that rotating it 180 degrees and permuting the digits gives you the same puzzle. The solution is going to be symmetric up to permuting the 7 digits: every 3 will be opposite a 1, every 4 will be opposite a 5, every 6 will be opposite a 7. $\endgroup$
    – Deusovi
    Nov 14 '20 at 22:48
  • $\begingroup$ (And the same is true of 60-degree rotations, not just 180-degree. The permutation isn't a simple digit swap, but it appears that we could create a consistent permutation that would work -- which leads me to question whether all solutions are the same, just with permuted digits.) $\endgroup$
    – Deusovi
    Nov 14 '20 at 22:58
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @Deusovi Given the solution of a single disc, there only three ways to fill all of the remaining discs. $\endgroup$ Nov 15 '20 at 16:38
2
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Solution:

enter image description here

Steps:

I didn't find it very difficult. It's basically just normal Sudoku techniques.

However I don't really know how to describe my process...

enter image description here
Start with some obvious 2's.

enter image description here
This leads to the completion of all 2's.

enter image description here
Now we can fill in all the 4's and 5's.

enter image description here
The remaining is quite straightforward from this point.

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