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You've heard of the change LEAD to GOLD by changing one letter at a time. A player has suggested another, and we're having a hard time with it. BITTER to SWEETS.

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    $\begingroup$ Is there a certain dictionary we should use? $\endgroup$ – Beastly Gerbil Sep 24 at 9:12
  • $\begingroup$ The urban dictionary $\endgroup$ – Deepthinker101 Sep 24 at 9:32
  • $\begingroup$ standard English, even British English is fine. There's a group of six to eight playing a word at a time. Any hints would be great. $\endgroup$ – TIM KRAMAR Sep 24 at 14:04
  • $\begingroup$ I see two answers. Awesome, thanks for the help. $\endgroup$ – TIM KRAMAR Sep 24 at 14:08
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Here is a way to do it in 10 jumps (all definitions come from Merriam-Webster)

BITTER
BETTER
SETTER
SEATER
SLATER
SLATES (as a verb)
SLANES
SLANTS
SLENTS
SLEETS (as a verb)
SWEETS

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BITTER BETTER SETTER SEATER SLATER SLATES SPATES SPALES SPALTS SPELTS SWELTS SWEETS

11 jumps

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  • $\begingroup$ I don't believe 'spelts' is a word. The plural of spelt is spelt and I can't find it in any of the main dictionaries $\endgroup$ – Beastly Gerbil Sep 24 at 9:13
  • $\begingroup$ Its a kind of wheat in plural $\endgroup$ – Deepthinker101 Sep 24 at 9:19
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    $\begingroup$ No, thats what I'm saying. The plural of 'spelt' as in the wheat is just spelt and not spelts. Its like sheep or fish, you don't add 's' on the end. See wikipedia its reffered to as spelt and never spelts $\endgroup$ – Beastly Gerbil Sep 24 at 9:21
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    $\begingroup$ @BeastlyGerbil you do add the suffix when you use the singular to mean "a species or variety of". For example: "Some fishes eat algae." Linguistically, (if not scientifically) I'd be quite ok with "Most spelts are now extinct." $\endgroup$ – Bass Sep 24 at 10:06
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    $\begingroup$ @Bass well I guess I stand corrected then :) $\endgroup$ – Beastly Gerbil Sep 24 at 10:09

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