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A mathematical split:

Can you split 34 into two parts such that four-seventh of one of these parts equals two-fifths of the other?

This puzzle is from a book so I can't give you a link.

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    $\begingroup$ I don't really think this is a riddle. After all it's just a pair of simultaneous equation $\endgroup$ Aug 19, 2020 at 16:48
  • $\begingroup$ Ok, but I can't delete it. $\endgroup$
    – math scat
    Aug 19, 2020 at 16:49
  • $\begingroup$ It's ok! No need to delete. It will likely be closed, but if you learn from your questions that get closed then it will help you make much better puzzles in the future! $\endgroup$ Aug 19, 2020 at 16:51
  • $\begingroup$ I voted to close ;-) $\endgroup$
    – math scat
    Aug 19, 2020 at 16:52
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    $\begingroup$ @BeastlyGerbil Why did you answer it then? :-) $\endgroup$ Aug 19, 2020 at 17:06

1 Answer 1

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Some simple simultaneous equations:

$4/7x = 2/5y$
$x + y = 34$

$x = 34 - y$
$4/7(34 - y) = 2/5y$
$136/7 - 4/7y = 2/5y$
$34/35y = 136/7$
$y = 20$
$x = 14$

So the answer is

Yes, 14 and 20

And to show its true:

4/7 of 14 is 4 lots of 2 which is 8.
2/5 of 20 is 2 lots of 4 which is 8.

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    $\begingroup$ It's much easier than that. Their ratio is $x:y :: \frac25:\frac47 :: 14:20$, so they are $\frac{14}{34}$ and $\frac{20}{34}$ of the total. $\endgroup$ Aug 19, 2020 at 17:41

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