5
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Make a correct equation by just moving one matchstick!

enter image description here

This is the source. Spoiler--source reveals answer.

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    $\begingroup$ You know the source reveal the answer, right? $\endgroup$ – Voldemort's Wrath Aug 11 at 22:51
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    $\begingroup$ @Voldemort'sWrath I didn't pay attention to it. I mean I didn't know. But I think that's the cheater's problem to look at it; not mine or non-cheaters. $\endgroup$ – aminabzz Aug 12 at 8:33
  • $\begingroup$ @aminabuzz -- I mean, if you're revealing the answer in the question, it's not a great question, is it? $\endgroup$ – Voldemort's Wrath Aug 12 at 13:26
  • $\begingroup$ @Voldemort'sWrath It's better to provide a link if the question isn't your own creation $\endgroup$ – aminabzz Aug 12 at 13:36
11
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Moving one:

enter image description here

From the '+' to make a '6' gives the true equation $6-4=2$

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  • $\begingroup$ Too small of an edit for me to suggest, but the numbers in the equation you wrote down are in the wrong order - not writing it here to prevent spoilers, but you need to swap 2 of the numbers around. $\endgroup$ – crazyloonybin Aug 12 at 14:11
  • $\begingroup$ @crazyloonybin good spot! Thanks :) $\endgroup$ – Beastly Gerbil Aug 12 at 14:11
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    $\begingroup$ No problem, the maths was still correct, but it was killing my OCD! $\endgroup$ – crazyloonybin Aug 12 at 14:13
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I suppose you could do:

5-4≠2 as well, because it's true!

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    $\begingroup$ That's an inequality, not an equation. $\endgroup$ – Mark Tilford Aug 11 at 22:17
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    $\begingroup$ Whoops, I forgot about that $\endgroup$ – Oliver Aug 12 at 10:05
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    $\begingroup$ Alternately, almost the same, ≤ $\endgroup$ – Ruadhan2300 Aug 12 at 11:22
  • $\begingroup$ @Ruadhan2300 I'm not sure you can really make a ≤ moving only 1 line, I guess you could add an angled line above an =, but that would be pretty far from the normal representation of that symbol. $\endgroup$ – DBS Aug 12 at 12:18
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    $\begingroup$ I've seen it written with two parallel lines and one angled in the past, though I'll admit it's not the norm. I think it'd be understood anyway :) $\endgroup$ – Ruadhan2300 Aug 12 at 13:07

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