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This is not an answer but a sample commentaries on puzzle creation


Whenever I create a puzzle, I don't try to make it too complex so that more number of people can enjoy my puzzle. Same such thing happened with my this puzzle: A Letter: When Sherlock meets MoriartyA Letter: When Sherlock meets Moriarty. I love the Sherlock on BBC and hence decided to make a series on Mr. Holmes.

First of all, it was a continuation of another puzzleanother puzzle, so the plot was fixed that Moriarty had to meet Sherlock and something that must happen should happen at 221b Baker Street. So then I needed an idea. My idea was just a compilation of the ongoing Fortnightly Challenge on the tag and Khale KithaKhale Kitha's puzzle on crosswordpuzzle on crossword. And the keywords in the puzzle (Earth, Water, Fire, Air, Space) were something that came into my mind few days before.

So I had the idea and the start of the puzzle. Now all I needed was a story. A story that could ignite the interest of the reader/solver in the puzzle and I also had to introduce the story of sequel of this puzzle.. So I typed every sentence while keeping these fact in mind.

After the story, I thought about some of the comments that readers could post something like "Hey, why didn't Mrs. Hudson noticed that Moriarty is building a new lock at her house". So I silently took care of this highly unlikely and the only possibility (that I could think of). It also worked as some red herring (I hope).

Then I posted the puzzle. But that's not it because you don't learn before posting the puzzle, you learn after posting it, when people give their valuable reviews. So I went into the chatroom and asked for any grammatical mistakes so that I could eliminate any confusion as early as possible. Then Jonathan corrected the address.

Later I surprisingly found out about another possible answer pointed outanother possible answer pointed out. So I added a thing to filter out the intended answer.

So, few things to learn:

  • Learn from your mistakes.

  • Don't hesitate to ask help whenever you are unsure.

  • Don't hesitate to make small changes to your puzzle to differentiate to your intended. (This thing doesn't apply if you are gonna make big changes in your puzzle)

  • Review your puzzle atleast twice. Look for the plot holes. I actually tried to solve the puzzle twice by myself after writing the story.

  • Take some ideas from other puzzles too. But don't make that idea the only thing that exists in your puzzle.

  • Make sure that the reader reads it till the end.

I can't think of anymore things that I need to tell about my puzzle or to add in the 'things to learn' list

This is not an answer but a sample commentaries on puzzle creation


Whenever I create a puzzle, I don't try to make it too complex so that more number of people can enjoy my puzzle. Same such thing happened with my this puzzle: A Letter: When Sherlock meets Moriarty. I love the Sherlock on BBC and hence decided to make a series on Mr. Holmes.

First of all, it was a continuation of another puzzle, so the plot was fixed that Moriarty had to meet Sherlock and something that must happen should happen at 221b Baker Street. So then I needed an idea. My idea was just a compilation of the ongoing Fortnightly Challenge on the tag and Khale Kitha's puzzle on crossword. And the keywords in the puzzle (Earth, Water, Fire, Air, Space) were something that came into my mind few days before.

So I had the idea and the start of the puzzle. Now all I needed was a story. A story that could ignite the interest of the reader/solver in the puzzle and I also had to introduce the story of sequel of this puzzle.. So I typed every sentence while keeping these fact in mind.

After the story, I thought about some of the comments that readers could post something like "Hey, why didn't Mrs. Hudson noticed that Moriarty is building a new lock at her house". So I silently took care of this highly unlikely and the only possibility (that I could think of). It also worked as some red herring (I hope).

Then I posted the puzzle. But that's not it because you don't learn before posting the puzzle, you learn after posting it, when people give their valuable reviews. So I went into the chatroom and asked for any grammatical mistakes so that I could eliminate any confusion as early as possible. Then Jonathan corrected the address.

Later I surprisingly found out about another possible answer pointed out. So I added a thing to filter out the intended answer.

So, few things to learn:

  • Learn from your mistakes.

  • Don't hesitate to ask help whenever you are unsure.

  • Don't hesitate to make small changes to your puzzle to differentiate to your intended. (This thing doesn't apply if you are gonna make big changes in your puzzle)

  • Review your puzzle atleast twice. Look for the plot holes. I actually tried to solve the puzzle twice by myself after writing the story.

  • Take some ideas from other puzzles too. But don't make that idea the only thing that exists in your puzzle.

  • Make sure that the reader reads it till the end.

I can't think of anymore things that I need to tell about my puzzle or to add in the 'things to learn' list

This is not an answer but a sample commentaries on puzzle creation


Whenever I create a puzzle, I don't try to make it too complex so that more number of people can enjoy my puzzle. Same such thing happened with my this puzzle: A Letter: When Sherlock meets Moriarty. I love the Sherlock on BBC and hence decided to make a series on Mr. Holmes.

First of all, it was a continuation of another puzzle, so the plot was fixed that Moriarty had to meet Sherlock and something that must happen should happen at 221b Baker Street. So then I needed an idea. My idea was just a compilation of the ongoing Fortnightly Challenge on the tag and Khale Kitha's puzzle on crossword. And the keywords in the puzzle (Earth, Water, Fire, Air, Space) were something that came into my mind few days before.

So I had the idea and the start of the puzzle. Now all I needed was a story. A story that could ignite the interest of the reader/solver in the puzzle and I also had to introduce the story of sequel of this puzzle.. So I typed every sentence while keeping these fact in mind.

After the story, I thought about some of the comments that readers could post something like "Hey, why didn't Mrs. Hudson noticed that Moriarty is building a new lock at her house". So I silently took care of this highly unlikely and the only possibility (that I could think of). It also worked as some red herring (I hope).

Then I posted the puzzle. But that's not it because you don't learn before posting the puzzle, you learn after posting it, when people give their valuable reviews. So I went into the chatroom and asked for any grammatical mistakes so that I could eliminate any confusion as early as possible. Then Jonathan corrected the address.

Later I surprisingly found out about another possible answer pointed out. So I added a thing to filter out the intended answer.

So, few things to learn:

  • Learn from your mistakes.

  • Don't hesitate to ask help whenever you are unsure.

  • Don't hesitate to make small changes to your puzzle to differentiate to your intended. (This thing doesn't apply if you are gonna make big changes in your puzzle)

  • Review your puzzle atleast twice. Look for the plot holes. I actually tried to solve the puzzle twice by myself after writing the story.

  • Take some ideas from other puzzles too. But don't make that idea the only thing that exists in your puzzle.

  • Make sure that the reader reads it till the end.

I can't think of anymore things that I need to tell about my puzzle or to add in the 'things to learn' list

1
source | link

This is not an answer but a sample commentaries on puzzle creation


Whenever I create a puzzle, I don't try to make it too complex so that more number of people can enjoy my puzzle. Same such thing happened with my this puzzle: A Letter: When Sherlock meets Moriarty. I love the Sherlock on BBC and hence decided to make a series on Mr. Holmes.

First of all, it was a continuation of another puzzle, so the plot was fixed that Moriarty had to meet Sherlock and something that must happen should happen at 221b Baker Street. So then I needed an idea. My idea was just a compilation of the ongoing Fortnightly Challenge on the tag and Khale Kitha's puzzle on crossword. And the keywords in the puzzle (Earth, Water, Fire, Air, Space) were something that came into my mind few days before.

So I had the idea and the start of the puzzle. Now all I needed was a story. A story that could ignite the interest of the reader/solver in the puzzle and I also had to introduce the story of sequel of this puzzle.. So I typed every sentence while keeping these fact in mind.

After the story, I thought about some of the comments that readers could post something like "Hey, why didn't Mrs. Hudson noticed that Moriarty is building a new lock at her house". So I silently took care of this highly unlikely and the only possibility (that I could think of). It also worked as some red herring (I hope).

Then I posted the puzzle. But that's not it because you don't learn before posting the puzzle, you learn after posting it, when people give their valuable reviews. So I went into the chatroom and asked for any grammatical mistakes so that I could eliminate any confusion as early as possible. Then Jonathan corrected the address.

Later I surprisingly found out about another possible answer pointed out. So I added a thing to filter out the intended answer.

So, few things to learn:

  • Learn from your mistakes.

  • Don't hesitate to ask help whenever you are unsure.

  • Don't hesitate to make small changes to your puzzle to differentiate to your intended. (This thing doesn't apply if you are gonna make big changes in your puzzle)

  • Review your puzzle atleast twice. Look for the plot holes. I actually tried to solve the puzzle twice by myself after writing the story.

  • Take some ideas from other puzzles too. But don't make that idea the only thing that exists in your puzzle.

  • Make sure that the reader reads it till the end.

I can't think of anymore things that I need to tell about my puzzle or to add in the 'things to learn' list