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3 the previous edit of mine broke the answer due to a formatting bug (reported on meta: http://meta.stackexchange.com/questions/243008). using a workaround. it even appears a little broken in the suggested edit preview, with 'only' on its own line...
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only

Only

an English-language dictionary, in general. For

For bonus points, here are some other languages where this does not hold: denoting "follows" by '>' and "doesn't follow" by '>#' : French

French: hier > demain, départ > arrivé, devant ># envers, début ># fin, passé > avenir, vie > mort German

German: gestern ># morgen, Abfahrt ># Ankunft, Vorderseite > Rückseite, Anfang ># Ende, Vergangenheit ># Zukunft, Leben ># Tod/Sterben Hence

Hence we could characterize any language with a 6-digit binary number (although the choice of words is in some cases subjective, as in whether 'front' vs 'back' refers to the human body or 'obverse'/'reverse' etc.)

 

only an English-language dictionary, in general. For bonus points, here are some other languages where this does not hold: denoting "follows" by '>' and "doesn't follow" by '>#' : French: hier > demain, départ > arrivé, devant ># envers, début ># fin, passé > avenir, vie > mort German: gestern ># morgen, Abfahrt ># Ankunft, Vorderseite > Rückseite, Anfang ># Ende, Vergangenheit ># Zukunft, Leben ># Tod/Sterben Hence we could characterize any language with a 6-digit binary number (although the choice of words is in some cases subjective, as in whether 'front' vs 'back' refers to the human body or 'obverse'/'reverse' etc.)

Only

an English-language dictionary, in general.

For bonus points, here are some other languages where this does not hold: denoting "follows" by '>' and "doesn't follow" by '>#' :

French: hier > demain, départ > arrivé, devant ># envers, début ># fin, passé > avenir, vie > mort

German: gestern ># morgen, Abfahrt ># Ankunft, Vorderseite > Rückseite, Anfang ># Ende, Vergangenheit ># Zukunft, Leben ># Tod/Sterben

Hence we could characterize any language with a 6-digit binary number (although the choice of words is in some cases subjective, as in whether 'front' vs 'back' refers to the human body or 'obverse'/'reverse' etc.)

 

2 spoiler tags fixed
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! only an English-language dictionary, in general.

! For bonus points, here are some other languages where this does not hold: denoting "follows" by '>' and "doesn't follow" by '>#' :

! French: hier > demain, départ > arrivé, devant ># envers, début ># fin, passé > avenir, vie > mort

! German: gestern ># morgen, Abfahrt ># Ankunft, Vorderseite > Rückseite, Anfang ># Ende, Vergangenheit ># Zukunft, Leben ># Tod/Sterben

! Hence we could characterize any language with a 6-digit binary number (although the choice of words is in some cases subjective, as in whether 'front' vs 'back' refers to the human body or 'obverse'/'reverse' etc.)

only an English-language dictionary, in general. For bonus points, here are some other languages where this does not hold: denoting "follows" by '>' and "doesn't follow" by '>#' : French: hier > demain, départ > arrivé, devant ># envers, début ># fin, passé > avenir, vie > mort German: gestern ># morgen, Abfahrt ># Ankunft, Vorderseite > Rückseite, Anfang ># Ende, Vergangenheit ># Zukunft, Leben ># Tod/Sterben Hence we could characterize any language with a 6-digit binary number (although the choice of words is in some cases subjective, as in whether 'front' vs 'back' refers to the human body or 'obverse'/'reverse' etc.)

! only an English-language dictionary, in general.

! For bonus points, here are some other languages where this does not hold: denoting "follows" by '>' and "doesn't follow" by '>#' :

! French: hier > demain, départ > arrivé, devant ># envers, début ># fin, passé > avenir, vie > mort

! German: gestern ># morgen, Abfahrt ># Ankunft, Vorderseite > Rückseite, Anfang ># Ende, Vergangenheit ># Zukunft, Leben ># Tod/Sterben

! Hence we could characterize any language with a 6-digit binary number (although the choice of words is in some cases subjective, as in whether 'front' vs 'back' refers to the human body or 'obverse'/'reverse' etc.)

only an English-language dictionary, in general. For bonus points, here are some other languages where this does not hold: denoting "follows" by '>' and "doesn't follow" by '>#' : French: hier > demain, départ > arrivé, devant ># envers, début ># fin, passé > avenir, vie > mort German: gestern ># morgen, Abfahrt ># Ankunft, Vorderseite > Rückseite, Anfang ># Ende, Vergangenheit ># Zukunft, Leben ># Tod/Sterben Hence we could characterize any language with a 6-digit binary number (although the choice of words is in some cases subjective, as in whether 'front' vs 'back' refers to the human body or 'obverse'/'reverse' etc.)

1
source | link

! only an English-language dictionary, in general.

! For bonus points, here are some other languages where this does not hold: denoting "follows" by '>' and "doesn't follow" by '>#' :

! French: hier > demain, départ > arrivé, devant ># envers, début ># fin, passé > avenir, vie > mort

! German: gestern ># morgen, Abfahrt ># Ankunft, Vorderseite > Rückseite, Anfang ># Ende, Vergangenheit ># Zukunft, Leben ># Tod/Sterben

! Hence we could characterize any language with a 6-digit binary number (although the choice of words is in some cases subjective, as in whether 'front' vs 'back' refers to the human body or 'obverse'/'reverse' etc.)